Majors-Combined-Languages

Request Information

Loading…

Widen your circle of conversation.

Being conversant in a foreign language not only helps you communicate with native speakers of that language, it also provides insight into the people, traditions, and culture of whole communities and countries where that language is spoken. As a combined languages major, your knowledge will broaden exponentially as you master two languages and cultures of your choosing.

One of the languages must be Spanish or French; if you wish, you can learn both, or you can select one and then add either American Sign Language (ALS), Chinese, German, Greek, Hebrew, Japanese, or Latin. By studying more than one language simultaneously, you’ll develop a unique multicultural perspective and be prepared to forge connections across cultures —  both near and far.

Requirements for:

Why Study Combined Languages at Clark?

  • Test your command of one of your chosen languages by completing two units of study abroad in a country where it is spoken, and take advantage of community-based learning opportunities in the Worcester area.
  • Explore and critique how national languages have been used to build and promote cultural continuity and identity through texts, films, and documentaries.
  • Build on your skills by taking higher-level language classes at other colleges within the Higher Education Consortium of Central Massachusetts, or engage in directed studies with individual professors.
This is Clark

Our Stories

Anne Fulton

Acquiring the tools to connect with other cultures

 

Anne Fulton ’19 is not only using the combined languages major to perfect her French, which she’s studied since grade school, but also to tackle what, for her, is a brand new and very different language: Japanese. For her, the best part of the combined languages major is the opportunity to immerse herself in many different cultures.

I think that in the modern age, where so much communication takes place on a global scale, learning a language gives you a responsibility to help people connect with each other.
—Anne Fulton

Class of 2019

Your Will. Your Way.

The Major Path

As a combined languages major, you’ll study two (or more!) of the languages that Clark offers: American Sign Language (ALS), Chinese, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Japanese, Latin, and Spanish. You’ll focus on building linguistic and cultural competencies while you work closely with a faculty adviser to choose your course of study.

The major requires a total of 13 courses, eight of which are in languages. With the assistance of your adviser, you’ll select four additional courses that complement your language courses. A required course for all majors within the Language, Literature and Culture Department — The National Imagination — explores and critiques how national languages have been used to build and promote cultural continuity and identity through texts, films, and documentaries. Finally, you’ll complete two units of study abroad in a country where one of your chosen languages is spoken — normally, these units will count toward the eight required language courses.

You can access higher-level language classes at other colleges within the Higher Education Consortium of Central Massachusetts, and/or engage in directed studies with individual Clark professors.

Skills you will learn include:

  • Translation; writing, oral, and reading comprehension in multiple languages; linguistics; and cultural competency and understanding
  • The basic building blocks of language: listening, speaking, reading and writing
  • Exploration of how national communities are constructed and critiqued through cultural artifacts

Located in the Goddard Library, the Language Arts Resource Center is a multimedia language instruction center. With its extensive collection of computer programs, audio, and videotapes, students studying a new language can access multiple sources of learning. A satellite dish receives international news broadcasts from more than 25 countries though SCOLA, a nonprofit educational organization that receives and re-transmits foreign TV programming from around the world.

During your junior year, you might be accepted into the combined languages honors program. Joining the program means you’ll work closely with a professor to create a thesis on a topic of your choice.

The LEEP difference

An education merging knowledge, action, and impact

With Liberal Education and Effective Practice, lessons begin in the classroom but never end there. Your learning includes world and workplace experiences that forge your skills and shape your path.

Learn more

Explore what the Language, Literature and Culture Department has to offer.