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Job and Internship Search Strategies

There are three primary ways to find a job or internship. The template below will help you develop a customized strategy that combines all three methods for a more comprehensive search.

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Also, check out different job boards to identify positions you might be interested in. Even if you’re not ready to apply for an internship or job, these sites are a great way to see what’s out there.

Follow These Steps

Find the right job boards for your field, industry, level of experience, and/or geographic location. Depending on the industry, some of the best jobs may be posted on smaller, “niche” sites.

Here are a few to get you started:

  • Handshake: Job board especially for companies looking for students and new graduates.
  • ClarkCONNECT: Jobs posted by Clark alumni.
  • Indeed.comLarge, general job board that pulls from other sites for a comprehensive listing. 
  • Additional job boards: Search listings on job boards for your industry; websites for professional organizations; or visit organizations you might like to work for, as their sites might contain information about pursuing careers in the field.

Contact the people in your network. Encourage them to send job positions your way or to refer you to job interviews. Expand your network by meeting alumni and others in your line of work.

People you already know:

  • Friends, family, and friends of family members
  • Faculty and department administrators
  • Fellow student club members
  • Colleagues from work, volunteering, or internships
Connect with alumni who might help you.

PRO TIP:

Don’t just ask for a job. Instead, let them know what kind(s) of opportunities you are looking for, and ask them if they have any suggestions for jobs, job boards, or people to talk to. This broader request is more likely to lead to useful referrals.

Some organizations will create a customized internship for you if you show an interest. Approach them with a spirit of curiosity to explore possibilities.

Take these steps:

  1. Define your internship goals: What do want to learn? What skills do you want to use or practice?
  2. Identify organizations where you might like to intern.
  3. Determine the best person to speak with at that organization.
  4. Is there someone who can introduce you? A colleague, friend, alumni, or faculty member?
  5. If so, ask that person to arrange a meeting.
  6. If not, send an inquiry email describing your interests and asking for a short meeting or phone call to discuss possibilities. Attach your resume.

Job Boards

handshake logo

Handshake is the career management system for Clark University students and alumni. Career Development posts thousands of internship and job opportunities in a diverse array of industry and geographical settings.Handshake, Clark’s job portal, is located behind the ClarkYou portal for all Clark students and alumni. Log into your ClarkYou account and locate the link on the left hand side of the page under “Web Services.” Once you activate your profile, your Clark University credentials will automatically log you into Handshake.

Alumni & Employers who would like a Handshake account, please should all log-in via our Handshake main page.

Clark Department Internships

Many academic departments and concentrations maintain lists of internship opportunities.

View Listing

Other Job Boards

  • LinkedIn: A professional networking tool that allows you to identify potential contacts in your field of interest; research companies; and explore career options. Check out Clark’s LinkedIn page to search for alumni.
  • The Vault Top InternshipsA listing of hundreds of internships with top companies, as well as reviews by previous interns.
  • Indeed.com and Simplyhired.com: Two sites that pull together job postings from multiple places, including company websites.
  • Idealist: A comprehensive resource for careers and volunteer positions in the nonprofit world.

How do I locate alternate job boards for my field or industry?

  1. Search using Google: “Job boards for (name industry or profession).”
  2. Look at the websites for professional organizations in your industry.
  3. Ask professionals (e.g., alums, colleagues, supervisors, professors, friends of parents, etc.) in that industry what boards they know about or use.
  4. Go to conferences for your industry — there may be on-site job boards or “meet-the-employer” events.
  5. Check the job boards list at the bottom of every page on the What Can I Do With This Major? site.