Clark University

ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY ISSUE: Vol. 92 No. 1 January 2016

 

 

 

Design of new Economic Geography JournalEconomic Geography is an internationally peer-reviewed journal, committed to publishing cutting-edge research that makes theoretical advances to the discipline. Our long-standing specialization is to publish the best theoretically-based empirical articles that deepen the understanding of significant economic geography issues around the world. Owned by Clark University since 1925, Economic Geography actively supports scholarly activities of economic geographers. Economic Geography is published quarterly in January, April, July, and October.

CONTENTS

 

 

Editorial

Journal Articl

 

 

Editor’s letter— Welcome to Economic Geography Volume 92

James Murphy, Pages 1–3
Complete Article | Enhanced Article

 

Roepke Lecture in Economic Geography— The right to work, and the right at work

Jamie Peck, Pages 4–30
Abstract | Complete Article | Enhanced Article | watch the video

 

Commentary on “The right to work, and the right at work”

Susan Christopherson, Pages 31–34
Complete Article | Enhanced Article

 

The Dynamics of Technical and Business Knowledge Networks in Industrial Clusters: Embeddedness, Status, or Proximity?

Pierre-Alexandre Balland, José Antonio Belso-Martínez, and Andrea Morrison, Pages 35–60
Abstract | Complete Article | Enhanced Article

 

Material Inheritances: How Place, Materiality, and Labor Process Underpin the Path-dependent Evolution of Contemporary Craft Production

Chris Gibson, Pages 61–86
Abstract | Complete Article | Enhanced Article

 

 

Both Marshall and Jacobs Were Right!

Andrea Caragliu, Laura de Dominicis, and Henri L.F. de Groot, Pages 87–111
Abstract | Complete Article | Enhanced Article

 

 

 

BOOK REVIE

 

Geographies of Globalization by Warwick E. Murray and John Overton

Matthew Sparke, pages 112–114
Read Book Review | Enhanced Article

 

Debt to Society: Accounting for Life under Capitalism by Miranda Joseph

 

Alan Walks, pages 115–117
Read Book Review | Enhanced Article

 

Coffee by Gavin Fridell

Tad Mutersbaugh, pages 118–119
Read Book Review | Enhanced Article

 

Public Universities and Regional Growth: Insights from the University of California edited by Martin Kenney and David Mowery

David Wolfe, pages 120–121
Read Book Review | Enhanced Article

 

 

 

 

 

 

Back to top


ABSTRACTS

Roepke Lecture in Economic Geography— The right to work, and the right at work by Jamie Peck

 

Abstract: Antiunion right to work (RTW) laws are a distinctive legacy of (trans)formative struggles around the industrial-relations settlement in the United States, and an enduring symbol of its stunted and bifurcated development. The RTW fault line, drawn in the 1940s and 1950s, was for a long time the sharpest spatial indicator of the divide between the union staging grounds of the industrial heartland and the much less organized and characteristically ‘deregulated’ South. After 1958, something like a cold war stalemate prevailed for half a century, however, with only an incremental drift to the RTW side, even as a new pattern of ‘flexible’ growth was incubated in the Sun Belt, as deindustrialization and trade displacement struck the Rust Belt, and as the political climate, post-Reagan, skewed decisively in favor of corporate interests. Nevertheless, the RTW line essentially held, that is, until the abrupt renewal of hostilities after 2008, following a Republican resurgence at the state and local level, coupled with a concerted, cross-country attack on a weakened labor movement led by an ideologically aligned coalition of business organizations, free-market think tanks, legal activists, and heavily bankrolled conservative advocacy networks. The former union strongholds of Indiana, Michigan, and Wisconsin have since gone RTW; practically every non-RTW state in the nation has witnessed the advance of this signature antiunion legislation; and a new generation of local RTW ordinances has been hatched. This article explores the implications of this sudden movement in the tectonic plates of the U.S. labor-relations system and the labor geographies that are being made (and broken) in its wake.

Key words: labor geography, restructuring, unions, employment regulation, conservatism


Complete Article            Enhanced Article

Back to top

 

Commentary on “The right to work, and the right at work” by Susan Christopherson, Pages 31–34

 


Complete Article | Enhanced Article

 

The Dynamics of Technical and Business Knowledge Networks in Industrial Clusters: Embeddedness, Status, or Proximity? by Pierre-Alexandre Balland, José Antonio Belso-Martínez, and Andrea Morrison

 

Abstract: Although informal knowledge networks have often been regarded as a key ingredient behind the success of industrial clusters, the forces that shape their structure and dynamics remain largely unknown. Drawing on recent network dynamic models, we analyze the evolution of business and technical knowledge networks within a toy cluster in Spain. Empirical results suggest that the dynamics of the two networks differ to a large extent. We find that status drives the formation of business knowledge networks, proximity is more crucial for technical knowledge networks, while embeddedness plays an equally important role in the dynamics of both networks.



Key words: knowledge networks, industrial clusters, network dynamics, toy industry, Spain



Complete Article          Enhanced Article

Back to top

Material Inheritances: How Place, Materiality, and Labor Process Underpin the Path-dependent Evolution of Contemporary Craft Production by Chris Gibson

 

Abstract: This article explores the historic–geographic evolution of contemporary craft production, with sensitivity to materiality of labor process, product design, and accompanying place mythologies. Craft production—increasingly interpolated as a form of creative work—is shaped by concerns about retrieving archaic tools and ways of making things, celebrating provenance and the haptic skills of makers, and delivering (and marketing) manual labor process. In contrast to evolutionary economic geography’s seeming immateriality and abstraction, attention is drawn to material aspects of place and path dependence that undergird geographies of new craft industries: how labor process evolves, in iteration with technical lock-ins that stem from production method, product design, and capacities of component materials, but also how legacies of mass manufacturing linger in putatively authentic places—shaping new geographic concentrations. An especially vivid case is explored: a cluster of cowboy bootmaking workshops in El Paso, Texas. Bootmaking has metamorphosed from artisanal to factory to a craft-based creative mode of production. Crucial were continuity in product design and evolution of labor process. So, too, was geography: an iconic borderland city location with historic legacies of labor intensive mass manufacturing; migrant workers with requisite embodied skills; antique tools; and significant stocks of leather, the core input material that must be seen, felt, and smelt by makers before fabrication. I argue for a grounded, critical evolutionary economic geography that requires stronger intersection with labor process, with the cultural logics infusing capitalism, and with greater recognition of material inheritances that are reconfigured in place over successive generations.


Key words: path-dependency, labor process, creative work, skill, authenticity, cultural capitalism



Complete Article        Enhanced Article         

Back to top

Both Marshall and Jacobs Were Right! by Andrea Caragliu, Laura de Dominicis, and Henri L.F. de Groot, Pages 87–111

 

Abstract: This article adds to the empirical evidence on the impact of agglomeration externalities on regional growth along three main dimensions. On the basis of data on 259 Europe NUTS2 (Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics) regions and 15 NACE (Nomenclature statistique des Activités économiques dans la Communauté Européenne) 1.1 2-digit industries for the period 1990–2007, we show that agglomeration externalities are stronger in technology-intensive industries, also after controlling for sorting; that specialization externalities are stronger for low density regions, while diversity matters more for denser urban areas; and, finally, that Jacobs externalities comprise a pure diversification effect (related variety) and a portfolio effect (unrelated variety), although evidence of positive effects on regional growth is only found for the latter. An additional contribution of this article is to extend the analysis on the basis of a full geographical coverage of European NUTS2 regions, with the aim to generalize the empirical identification of the impacts of specialization and diversification externalities with respect to the existing literature. Our results are robust to a rich set of consistency checks, including the use of spatial autoregressive models with autoregressive disturbances, used to assess to what extent the effects of agglomeration externalities are localized.


Key words: agglomeration externalities, employment growth, European regions, spatial econometrics, R11, R19

Complete Article     Enhanced Article

 

Back to top

 

 

e-mail alerts

Receive content alert notifications for future issues of Economic Geography

Published by Clark University since 1925.

UPCOMING ARTICLES

April 2016

The comparative effect of subnational and nationwide cultural variation on subsidiary ownership choices: The role of spatial coordination challenges and Penrosean growth constraints
Arjen H. L. Slagen

 

 

Path Creation as a Process of Resource Alignment and Anchoring—Industry Formation for On-site Water Recycling in Beijing
Christian Binz, Bernhard Truffer, and Lars Coenen

 

Open Trade, Price Supports, and Regional Price Behavior in Mexican Maize Markets
Frank Davenport, Doug Steigerwald and Stuart Sweeney

 

Doing Evolution in Economic Geography
Andy Pike, Andrew Cumbers, Stuart Dawley, Danny MacKinnon, and Robert McMaster

 

 

 

 

FUTURE ISSUES

 

Financializing Detroit
Jamie Peck, Heather Whiteside

 

 

Sociospatial Culture and Entrepreneurship: Some Theoretical and Empirical Observations
Robert Huggins, Piers Thompson

 

Crowdfunding in the United Kingdom: A Cultural Economy
Paul Langley

 

Out of Sight, Out of Mind: When Proximities Matter for Mutual Fund Flows

Stéphanie Lavigne, Dalila Nicet-Chenaf

 

 

Universities, Public Research, and Evolutionary Economic Geography

Paul Vallance

 

The Importance of Housing for Self-Employment

Darja Reuschke


 

 

 

 







© 2016 Clark University·