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Events and Conferences

audience revewing an event

An important component of the Strassler Center’s mission is education and outreach to the general public and the scholarly community.  For more information on upcoming events and conferences, please contact the Center’s program manager Robyn Conroy.  To receive notifications about all upcoming events and to join our mailing list, contact Alissa Duke.

If you would like to learn more about past events and academic conferences, we invite you to visit our previous events page, where you can listen to or watch audio/video recordings.

Upcoming Events

28 September 2021 |4 p.m. |Zoom (Online)
Clark University

Facing off or facing up to ‘the end’?  : Reflections on the omnicidal trajectory of homo anthropocenus’

Speaker: Mark Levene (Emeritus fellow at the University of Southampton UK, and a long-time environmental and peace activist. He writes, among other things, about genocide, European and Middle Eastern nationalisms and “minority” relations, as well as anthropogenic climate change. He is founder of Rescue!History.)

In part by way of personal life history, Mark Levene will explore how the human species, or more precisely its hegemonic elements, has put itself on a path to planetary obliteration. He will seek then with the audience to consider what might be done to put us on a kinder, gentler path to ensure our own survival and that of future generations.

Sponsored the Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies 

Registration required.   Register in advance for this webinar

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

We will also offer a livestream of the event on the Strassler Center’s Facebook page.

Email Program Manager Robyn Conroy at rconroy@clarku.edu for more information.

 

21 October 2021 |4 p.m. | Zoom (Online)
Clark University

Environcide: Environmental Warfare as a Crime against Humanity and Nature

Speaker: Emanuel Kreike (Professor of History; Acting Director, African Studies, Princeton University)

Emmanuel Kreike teaches African, environmental, and global history at Princeton University. His research focuses on the intersection between war, environment, and society using a comparative and global approach. His recently published book, Scorched Earth: Environmental Warfare as a Crime against Humanity and Nature (Princeton University Press, 2021), highlights the impact of 16th-20th century conventional war on society and environment. Scorched Earth is the first volume in what he hopes will become the Environcide Trilogy. The second book project on modern (counter) insurgency wars is in an advanced stage and he has laid the groundwork for a third book project on the impact of the violence of the slave trade on the Atlantic World.

Sponsored the Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies 

Registration required.   Register in advance for this webinar

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

We will also offer a livestream of the event on the Strassler Center’s Facebook page.

Email Program Manager Robyn Conroy at rconroy@clarku.edu for more information.

 

3 November 2021 | 5 p.m. | Zoom (Online)
Clark University

The Ecology of Genocide

Speaker: Felipe Milanez (Professor at the Institute for Humanities, Arts and Sciences Professor Milton Santos and the Multidisciplinary Postgraduate Program in Culture and Society, of the Federal University of Bahia, Brazil.)

This presentation investigates the physical destruction of indigenous peoples, peasants and traditional communities in the Brazilian Amazon. Historically, the Amazon has given refuge to massacre survivors and provided the means to rebuild worlds destroyed in wars of conquest. The capture of territories and resource control are perennial engines of contemporary genocide perpetrated against indigenous peoples in Brazil, which has accelerated with the rise of fascist military authoritarianism and the disproportional effects of the Covid-19 pandemic among indigenous and blacks Brazilians. Resisting genocide and defending forests, rivers and the ecology of life are deeply interconnected, as the destruction of forests is not only a crime against nature  (or ecocide), but destroys the living conditions for indigenous peoples (and traditional and peasant communities) who have survived genocide.

Sponsored by A new Earth conversation (NEC) and the Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies

Registration required.   Register in advance for this webinar

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

We will also offer a livestream of the event on the Strassler Center’s Facebook page.

Email Program Manager Robyn Conroy at rconroy@clarku.edu for more information.

 

10 November 2021 | 3 p.m. | Zoom (Online)
Clark University

Especially for Students Lecture

Indian Scalps for Money: A Hidden History of Colonial Times

Speaker: Mishy Lesser (Learning Director, Upstander Project)

In a new short film, Bounty, Penobscot parents and their children celebrate their survival by reacting to a government-issued bounty proclamation that promised large sums of money for colonial settlers to hunt, scalp, and murder their ancestors. Dr. Mishy Lesser, learning director of Upstander Project, will introduce Bounty and will be joined during the Q&A by Clark students Lamisa Muksitu and Penelope Kogan who collaborated with her as summer interns on the teacher’s guide that accompanies the film.

Email Program Manager Robyn Conroy at rconroy@clarku.edu for more information.

Sponsored by the Undergraduate Program in Holocaust and Genocide Studies (Ina and Haskell Gordon Endowed Fund)

 

 

Contact Information

Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies

Contact Us
  • Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies
    Clark University
    950 Main Street
    Worcester, MA 01610
  • 508-793-8897
  • 508-793-8827 Fax