Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies

Multimedia Archive

In 1940, the historian Emanuel Ringelblum established a clandestine organization, code named Oyneg Shabes, in Nazi-occupied Warsaw to document and preserve the history of Jewish life in wartime Poland. As the Final Solution unfolded, the group persevered until the spring of 1943. Only three of its more than 60 members survived. Ringelblum and his family perished in March 1944, but not before he had managed to hide thousands of documents in milk cans and tin boxes. Searchers found two of these buried caches in 1946 and 1950.

An acclaimed scholar and speaker, Samuel Kassow, Charles H. Northam Professor of History, Trinity College, has lectured and taught across eastern Europe, as well as in Mexico and Israel. He has held National Endowment for the Humanities, Fulbright, Woodrow Wilson, Danforth, and IREX Fellowships, and currently serves as a consultant to the Museum of the History of Polish Jews now being built in Warsaw. A child of Holocaust survivors, Professor Kassow was born in a Displaced Persons camp in Germany.

Samuel Kassow
"Emanuel Ringelblum and the Secret Ghetto Archive"
September 19, 2007
Tilton Hall, Higgins University Center, Clark University
RT: 87 minutes
Sponsored by: Strassler Family Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies