Faculty and Staff

Services for faculty and staff

The LEEP Center staff is excited to work with faculty on a variety of in-class and departmental presentations relevant to any major. We're happy to fill in if you need to cancel a class. Class presentations could include:

“What can I do with a major in…”

  • Gaining relevant experience
  • Writing resumes and cover letters
  • Interviewing and networking
  • The job search process
  • Applying to graduate school

Getting Involved

Faculty support is an important part of a student’s journey with LEEP at Clark. Here are a few ways you can get involved and help your students.

LEEP Project mentors

LEEP Projects are an important part of the LEEP initiative. All Clark faculty and staff are eligible to consider mentoring a student on a LEEP Project.

Internships for academic credit

Students who complete an internship for academic credit must identify a Clark faculty sponsor to supervise the internship. This helps ensure its academic validity and allows the university to evaluate the success of the internship from an academic perspective.

Advising for study abroad

Faculty advising for study abroad focuses on three types of students: first years, applicants and returned students.

Community-based learning and research

Community-based learning and research courses permeate Clark’s curriculum. Learn how to incorporate a component of this into your classroom.

On-Campus Student Employment

Mentorships

All Clark faculty and staff are invited to consider mentoring a student on a LEEP Project.

LEEP Projects are an important part of the LEEP initiative, first piloted in 2012 with the LEEP Pioneers. A LEEP Project may respond to the needs of an external organization, build on an existing research program, or be self-initiated as in the case of an artistic or entrepreneurial endeavor. A number of projects will be sponsored by Clark alumni and will be completed offsite.

Learn More

Project Information for Faculty Mentors [PDF]

Spring 2016 Faculty hints for the IRB Process [PDF]
 

Resources

Guidelines for working with employers [PDF]

(graphic for Local Knowledge Database)

Have you conducted research in Worcester, particularly in the Main South community? Submit your research projects to the Local Knowledge collection of the Clark Digital Commons, an online research repository. Contact Community Engagement for more information.

Interfolio, letter of reference file service

Interfolio is an online credentials management service available to Clark students and alumni. It allows individuals to create and self-manage a portfolio of their credentials, including confidential and non-confidential letters of recommendation, writing samples and evaluations.

Reference letter resources

Equal employment policy

How to follow Equal Employment Law while assisting students with their job search

Student post-graduation success is important to all of us at Clark. Employers from every industry are eager to hire Clark graduates and, occasionally, potential employers will approach faculty and staff to share a job or internship opportunity, or may ask for help connecting them with qualified students. While it’s natural to want to help our students secure employment, the University must follow Equal Employment Law in all interactions with employers to avoid unanticipated illegal or unethical actions.

The Career Services office is well versed in legal issues related to recruiting and serves as the primary contact for employer relations on campus.

The National Association of Colleges and Employers, the leading source of information on the employment of the college educated, provides the following guidelines for faculty and staff in their Guide to Ethical and Legal Standards in Student Hiring:

  • If you receive a request for student referrals, you may notify students who have expressed an interest in such positions and encourage them to apply. Also, you may announce the opportunity to your classes or distribute the job description via listserv. However, for your protection as well as that of the University, the initial request from the employers should be sent to Career Services so the position can be posted openly for all students.
  • When you provide only a few names without also broadly publicizing the position through Career Services, you aren’t maintaining a fair and equitable recruiting process and are vulnerable to charges of discrimination. If faculty or staff pre-screen candidates, they are, in effect, acting as an employment agency and may have to justify the criteria upon which the screening was based. By law, every qualified candidate interested in the opportunity should be able to apply; it’s the employer’s responsibility to decide who is the best fit.
  • The less directly involved staff and faculty are in making choices for employers, the less likely the staff and institution will be subject to administrative claims and litigation if a student believes he or she was discriminated against as a result of not being selected to interview.
  • Confusion or misunderstandings may occur when an employer works with more than one campus office on the same issue and this serves to undermine the focus on generating viable employment opportunities for students.
  • Career Services may have an existing relationship with the employer or the specific individual who contacted you, or may wish to expand its relationship to enhance student opportunities. By contacting Career Services, you can facilitate appropriate follow-up and help develop future prospects.
  • Selecting only certain candidates to present to an employer may set unreasonable expectations for both employers and students. Employers may come to expect that every student who submits an application meets all of their qualifications. Students, in turn, may develop a sense that they will be “placed” or “matched” with a job once they graduate. These expectations are inconsistent with Career Services’ goal of teaching students to process of personal and professional exploration and development, skills they will use across their lifetime.

We appreciate your assistance in assuring an employment process that’s free from discrimination and provides equal opportunities to all qualified students.

Please contact Career Services with any questions or concerns – and, of course, any job or internship leads from employers.