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Date:  Friday, April 29, 2022
Time: 12:30 p.m – 1:30 p.m.
Location:
Jefferson 320

In this exploration of Clark’s research on race, gender, and ethnicity, Professors Power-Greene and Fábos facilitate a discussion while highlighting two recent faculty works: Professor Wilson reports on the research in “Mid-Century Modernism and the American Body: Race, Gender, and the Politics of Power in Design,” and Professor Bhachu discusses “Movers and Makers: Uncertainty, Resilience and Migrant Creativity in Worlds of Flux.”

Read a recap of the session: Professors explore counternarratives of design and innovation.

Presented by

Kristina Wilson

Kristina Wilson

Professor of Art History

Kristina Wilson most recently authored “Mid-Century Modernism and the American Body: Race, Gender, and the Politics of Power in Design.” She is also the author of two award-winning books: “The Modern Eye: Stieglitz, MoMA, and the Art of the Exhibition,” which won the Eldredge Prize for Outstanding Scholarship in American Art in 2011; and “Livable Modernism: Interior Decorating and Design During the Great Depression” (2004), which received the Charles Montgomery Book Award from the Decorative Arts Society. Wilson co-curated the 2016 Worcester Art Museum exhibition “Cyanotypes: Photography’s Blue Period,” which won an Award for Excellence from the Association of Art Museum Curators. She also has written numerous articles for journals and exhibition catalogs on subjects relating to design, painting, and museum history in 20th-century America.

Parminder Bhachu

Parminder Bhachu

Professor of Sociology

Parminder Bhachu studies the complex movements of people across international borders and examines their cultural and technical creativity and what makes them particularly adept at navigating uncertainty in fragile worlds. She is the author of “Movers and Makers: Resilience, Uncertainty and Migrant Creativity in Worlds of Flux,” “Twice Migrants,” and Dangerous Designs, and co-editor of “Enterprising Women” and “Immigration and Entrepreneurship.” At Clark, she was the Henry R. Luce Professor in Cultural Identities and Global Processes for nine years and director of the Women’s Studies program. Bhachu is a multiple-migrant maker who has lived in four continents, East Africa, the United Kingdom, Asia, and on both sides of the east and west coasts of the United States.

Ousmane Power-Greene

Ousmane Power-Greene

Associate Professor of History

Ousmane Power-Greene is director of the Africana Studies Program at Clark. His first book, “Against Wind and Tide: The African American Struggle against the Colonization Movement,” examines Black Americans’ efforts to agitate in opposition to the American Colonization Society’s racial deportation project to Liberia. He also co-edited a collection of essays, “In Search of Liberty: Nineteenth Century African American Internationalism.” His current book project explores Black American activists and intellectuals who joined the colonization movement and left for Liberia. Over his career, Power-Greene’s scholarship has been recognized with various fellowships, most notably the prestigious Schomburg Center scholar-in-residence program, sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities. He earned his Ph.D., M.A., and M.Ed. from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and a B.A. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Anita Fábos

Anita Fábos

Professor and Associate Director, International Development, Community, and Environment Department

An anthropologist, Anita Fábos has integrated teaching, research, and participatory programs that have incorporated refugee and forced migrant perspectives into collaborative work with scholars, practitioners, refugee organizations, policymakers, and international organizations. At Clark, she coordinates the IDCE graduate concentration and Certificate in Refugees, Forced Migration, and Belonging, Clark’s Scholars-at-Risk chapter, and is co-convener of the new Integration and Belonging Hub. Students in her classes have carried out community-based projects to investigate refugee participation in community development initiatives, refugee access to higher education, refugee livelihoods in Worcester, and experiences of belonging and home for people from refugee and non-refugee backgrounds.

Fábos has worked and conducted research together with Muslim Arab Sudanese in the diaspora on transnational identity and mobility in the Middle East, Europe, and North America.