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FYI Course Descriptions

ARTS 204 - Sacred Space

Aesthetic Perspective

In Sacred Space, we explore a language of interdependence in the human relationship to the natural world at a time when, due to the threats of climate change, a transformation in human awareness is critically important.Spatial archetypes express essential ways that energy lives and works in our human consciousness, in the built environment and in the natural world. The play of duality is the defining dynamic of most archetypal forms; in the class we both explore and practice it through dialogue.While the class draws on myths, stories and other texts, images, architecture and music from diverse cultures, it also includes several contemporary texts related to the climate crisis. Our intention is to deepen our awareness of this unprecedented challenge within a larger context, and to consider how we might choose to conduct ourselves in the face of it.The course requires several short written essays, a commitment on each student's part to a practice of their choosing, and in-depth individual projects developed as research studies or art projects.

BIOL 101 - Introduction to Biology I

Science Perspective

This course provides an introduction to biology appropriate for those interested in general biology, genetics, and cellular-level biology, or who are contemplating a career in the health sciences. It is designed with three general goals in mind: (1) to provide students with an understanding of the unifying themes in modern biology, (2) to introduce students to the diversity of life forms at all levels of organization, and (3) to illustrate the methods and modes of scientific inquiry in the biological sciences. Students are introduced to principles of evolution and genetics. Fulfills the Science Perspective.

BIOL 103 - Environmental and Conservation Biology

Science Perspective

This course provides an introduction to biology appropriate for those interested in environmental and conservation biology. It is designed with three general goals in mind: (1) to provide students with an understanding of the unifying themes in modern biology, (2) to introduce students to the diversity of life forms at all levels of organization, and (3) to illustrate the methods and modes of scientific inquiry in the biological sciences. Students are introduced to principles of evolution, genetics, behavior and ecology. Satisfies BIOL 101 requirement for the biology major and is one of three core requirements for the environmental science major. Fulfills the Science Perspective.

BIOL 144 - Bioethics: stem cells, embryos and reproduction

Values Perspective

One of the critical challenges in modern science is our ability to shape human development. This has brought embryology into the public domain. Based on our current scientific understanding of the development of the embryo we now have the ability to plan the sex of our children, test for the presence of certain genes and abort those embryos that do not meet certain genetic criteria and clone human cell nuclei to produce stem cells identical to patients who might need them. The questions we now face are: Even if we can do these things, should we do them? Under what conditions should such procedures be allowed or forbidden? Do we wish to support the research that will make such procedures possible? Using a primarily discussion-based format we will explore the science surrounding these recent technological advances in embryological sciences and address some of the key associated societal and ethical concerns.

CHEM 101 - Introductory Chemistry I

Science Perspective

This course is designed to meet the needs of science majors with an interest in chemistry, biochemistry, biology, or environmental science and students with an interest in the health professions. It will introduce students to fundamental chemical concepts dealing with the structure, bonding, and reactivity of molecules. Major topics include thermochemistry, ideal gas theory, chemical periodicity, and bonding and geometry of molecules. The laboratory sections introduce students to the techniques of chemical experimentation and the methods of chemical analysis needed for chemistry and other sciences. Knowledge of high-school algebra is necessary; high-school chemistry and physics are helpful, but not required. Registration includes a pre-lecture meeting time one day a week. Must register for one laboratory section.

CHEM 103 - Accelerated Introductory Chemistry

Science Perspective

This is a one-semester course for students with a strong background in chemistry who do not need the traditional two-semester sequence. Upon completion of CHEM 103, students are eligible to go directly to CHEM 131 - Organic Chemistry I , thereby accelerating their program in chemistry by one semester and allowing for additional elective courses during their junior and senior years. Topics include atomic and molecular structure, geometry, bonding, reactions, equilibria, thermodynamics, acids and bases, basic kinetics and stoichiometry.

CMLT 109 - Human Rights and Literature

Global Comparative Perspective

In this class, we will read literary and cultural documents to contemplate the concept of "human rights." What rights do all humans have, simply by virtue of being human? Who counts as human? Do current understandings of human rights exclude some people? Do humans have more rights than other species? How do questions of gender and sexuality fit into the discussion of human rights? As we seek to answer these questions, we will trace the development of human rights discourses from the Enlightenment to the present, looking at literature from a variety of cultures and human rights documents from a variety of sources. We will supplement our readings with outreach to local human rights organizations.

CMLT 129 - Shock of the New: Revolution in Hispanic Culture

Historical Perspective

Explores the ways in which the arts (literature, cinema and painting) are both transformative and transformed by major changes in ideology, science and technology, psychology, and society at large. Shock and change also happen when cultures contact and collide. Examples of topics covered in this course could be: the birth of cinema, the influence of Marxism in figures like Che Guevara, Fidel Castro and Pablo Neruda, Freud's influence in Dali and the surrealists, Frida Kahlo as a feminist icon, and Africa's influence on Picasso. Different topics and periods will be covered each semester. Taught in English.

ECON 010 - Economics and the World Economy

Global Comparative Perspective

This course provides an introduction to international economic interactions and the macroeconomic analysis of economies. The course develops basic economic concepts including market analysis, trade, and demand and supply in the macroeconomy. Comparisons across countries provide a deeper understanding of business cycles, unemployment, monetary policy, economic growth, currencies and fiscal policy. These economic concepts provide tools to analyze current issues such as economic stability, debt crises and policies towards trade. Open to first-year students. Fulfills the global comparative perspective.

EDUC 060 - Public Schools and Democracy

Historical Perspective

From Colonial times to the present, Americans have looked to free public education to be the main instrument for all citizens to access political maturity and equality, as well as economic opportunity. In 1848, educator Horace Mann wrote: "Education ... is the great equalizer of the conditions of men the balance wheel of the social machinery." In this seminar, using primary documents-laws, reports, and court decisions both historical and contemporary, we will explore both the historical context and, especially, the current realities in public schools, to determine how effective they have been and are at present in carrying out this crucial responsibility.

ENG 118 - Webs and Labyrinths: Introduction to Narrative Theory

Verbal Expression

This course is an introduction to stories and storytelling. What is narrative? We will consider the various forms, genres, and structures of narrative, including such aspects as point-of-view, chronology, plot, unreliable narrators, and the relationship of narrative to history and memory. In the second half of the course, we will turn our attention to the ways in which storytelling has changed in the era of globalization. We now live in a world of webs, labyrinths, and networks--metaphors that suggest the breaking down of borders and increased connectivity across cultures, nations, markets, and geographies. This course will introduce you to writers and theorists seeking a language fitting to an age of constant newness. We will consider different sorts of fictions associated with the era of global culture: reflexive modes of storytelling that break down boundaries between artists and audiences; sweeping historical novels that weave together the real and the "magical"; and multimedia narratives that combine texts and technology. Our focus will be on the dialogues that take place among genres and disciplines, and on narrative experiments that make it increasingly difficult to draw clear distinctions between fiction, poetry, drama, and visual culture. Students enrolled in this course should enjoy working with texts that at times can be abstract and philosophical.

ENG 125 - Medical Ethics in Science Fiction

Values Perspective

This First Year Intensive Seminar focuses on the ethical, legal, and social implications of medical science as interrogated through science fiction texts. Students will engage in a variety of writing assignments designed to think about not only literary genre (science fiction) but also larger social/ethical issues, exploring questions such as: How does medical science as depicted in science fiction shape how we understand our humanity? Our personhood? And how does this culturally and historically contingent institution shape relationships, individual-to-individual, individual-to-group, and group-to-group? This course counts towards the Genre requirement in the English Major.

ENG 169 - Seeing New Englandly

Verbal Expression

Studies the development of American literature, how it separated itself from European traditions by localizing its context within its own demographic. Authors read my include Emerson, Poe, Dickinson, Frost, Howthornes, Whitman, and Thoreau.

ENG 180 - Major American Writers I

Verbal Expression

The sequence ENG 180- ENG 181 takes an historical approach to American literature from Puritanism to the present. This course concentrates on early American literature, circa 1620-1860, by authors such as Bradstreet, Rowlandson, Edwards, Franklin, Emerson, Douglass, Dickinson, Whitman, Hawthorne, Melville, Stowe, and others. For undergraduate English majors and minors, this course partially satisfies the Historical Sequences (A) requirement.

ENT 105 - Creating a Culture of Innovation

Values Perspective

Are creativity and innovation synonymous? How do you create and support a culture of innovation? This course will combine theory and experiential assignments to introduce students to the concepts of creatvity and innovation as a source of social change. Students will gain a greater understanding of and appreciation for the creative/innovative processes and learn how to harness and direct those forces for themselves and others. This course will help prepare students to contribute in a unique and productive way to today's entrepreneurial, societal, and organizational demands.

GEOG 075 - Americans and the Environment

Historical Perspective

This first-year intensive, run as a seminar, will immerse students in the study of how Americans have interacted with their environments, ending in the present and looking to the near future. It will focus on key themes, moments, and debates, with a particular emphasis on New England and the Worcester region. Local and regional field trips to key sites will complement the readings. It will encompass aspects of environmental history; the evolution of US environmental law, policy, and social movements; and the role of both the United States as a country, and individual Americans as citizens and consumers, in contemporary environmental politics and interactions

GEOG 101 - Food Justice and Food Movements

Values Perspective

In this course we will be examining the meaning of "food justice" and the multiple movements attempting to change the highly destructive existing industrial food system in the US and elsewhere. At the same time, we will be working on the Real Food Challenge at Clark. The Real Food Challenge is a US student-led campaign to shift institutional purchasing toward food that is more humane, worker friendly, environmental sound, and advancing of local economies. In signing the Challenge Clark University committed to having 20% "real food" by 2020. "Real food" consists of food that has certain certifications to qualify it as local, fair, humane, or ecologically sound. This class will incorporate the practical work that goes along with the commitment, working on the real food calculator and raising campus awareness of the Challenge, with learning the intricate world of the global productive system. This means looking through the lens of the Real Food Wheel to examine all of the different facets that make the food system. This means producers, earth, consumers, customers, and earth. The Real Food Wheel will act as the vehicle for explaining the social, cultural, ecological, moral, and economic impacts of the modern food system.

HIST 044 - Picking up the Gun: A history of violence in African American Social and Political Movements

Historical Perspective

This first year intensive course takes up the history of radicals, revolutionaries, and reformers by examining the role of violence in their struggle for democratic rights, or what some scholars now call "freedom rights". It explores the use of violence within movements to end slavery; it looks at the use of violence to attain political rights by women, black Americans, and other ethnic and religious minorities; it examines the advocacy of violence during movements against Jim Crow segregation and lynching; it considers how people and groups employed violence to end economic exploitation and class-based oppression; and it explores the use of violence by those who challenged state-violence, mass incarceration, detention, and police shootings. We will approach the topic of violent resistance by reading historical documents, philosophical treatise, analyzing poetry, pouring over fiction, and viewing films. Thus, our approach to the America's violent past will cut across academic disciplines in order to examine the vantage point of both those who advocated (and participated in) violent actions against the government and other citizens and, those who rejected violence on principal and/or because they did not believe the use of violence to be an effective means to attain citizenship rights.

HIST 055 - 9/11 in Fact and Fiction

Historical Perspective

In the immediate aftermath of the 9/11 attacks, students at Clark and other universities across America remarked again and again that "everything is different now." Nine years after al-Qaeda brought down the World Trade Center, however, many Americans question whether anything at all has changed, either at home or abroad. This first-year seminar will examine this apparent contradiction by placing the events of 9/11 into historical context. Among the questions we will explore are: Were the events of 9/11 truly unprecedented in American history? Were the American public and their leaders aware of the rising tide of Islamic extremism during the 1990s? How did al-Qaeda's assault on America affect Arabs and other Muslims living in the United States? How have civil liberties in America more generally fared in the age of the Patriot Act? How have the events of 9/11 been depicted in literature, film, and popular cultural phenomena such as interactive video games? Each student will be expected to undertake an oral history evaluating the impact of 9/11 on his or her own family and to participate in a collaborative group project examining how the events of 9/11 affected the Clark community. The class will also take a field trip to New York City to visit Ground Zero. History 055 carries an HP designation.

ID 105 - Visualizing Human Rights: Culture, Law, and the Politics of Representation

Values Perspective

What do human rights look like? This seminar examines the advocacy strategies NGOs use to make human rights visible to different audiences the general public, government officials, policy-makers, international courts, etc. Particular attention is focused on the tactics NGOs employ to mobilize expert opinions, popular sentiment, and material resources to contest the status quo and to promote the protection of human rights. Students will gain familiarity with some of the key actors, legal frameworks, and best practices used in the "human rights community," including their main strengths and weaknesses. They will also develop a grounded understanding of human rights campaigns and the role advocacy efforts play in shaping international affairs, legal proceedings, and moral debates. Finally, students will enhance their ability to critically analyze and to ethically employ the digital technologies (e.g. mobile phones, social media, crisis mapping, satellite imagery) that shape how human rights violations are visualized today.

ID 106 - Healthy Cities

Global Comparative Perspective

What makes a city a healthy place to live, work, and go to school? How does the health of a "place" affect the health of the individuals who live there? Who is responsible for the health of a city's residents? The goal of this course is to introduce students to key challenges in urban public health and to Worcester, MA as a city determined to be the "the healthiest city in New England by 2020" in Worcester, MA. Students in the course will acquire an understanding of the key concepts and methodologies from a range of disciplines, including anthropology, sociology, and public health, and how they employ those tools to examine urban health problems. Students in this course will explore and engage in a wide range of topics related to healthy cities. This is an entry course to the newly established collaboration between Clark and the Worcester Division of Public Health. Students who enroll in this class will get in-depth exposure to issues related to healthy cities, rights to the city, and environmental and urban issues that can potentially impact (positively or negatively) the health of its residents. Health, here, of course will be considered as "a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity" (WHO 1948). Students will have to critically reflect on reading material, but will also be introduced to interpreting basic health data and relating it to the urban environment in which they live. They will also get the opportunity to interact with public health professionals from the Department of Public Health, and apply through field trips what they learn in class to the real world.

IDND 011 - Making a Difference

Verbal Expression

This course will offer a scholarly perspective on "making a difference," defined as the many varieties of social change ranging from philanthropy to political activism. Students will analyze how others have made a difference in a range of times and places, and will learn skills to make a difference at three levels: in their lives, on the Clark campus, and in the city of Worcester. This is a multi-disciplinary course in which readings will be derived from the fields of sociology, psychology, community development, urban studies, education, social policy, and political science. Themes of personal growth, leadership, collaboration, and activism will be explored. In addition to writing assignments, students will be expected to participate actively in class discussions and experiential exercises, as well as complete a structured service placement in a neighborhood agency. The concluding assignment will be a proposal for community-based social change activity.

IDND 021 - Queer Horror

Verbal Expression

From Frankenstein to Freddy Krueger, the horror monster has thrilled and terrified horror fans for decades. What the general audience might not recognize is how the monster embodies society's anxieties, particularly those involving sexuality and gender. In this class, we will analyze a selection of horror novels and films, paying attention to how the monsters are "coded" as queer, exploring how the monsters are representations of popular culture's changing views on queerness, and considering how and why the queer monster has evolved over the decades. We will also consider how a queer audience might have responded to these monsters.

IDND 087 - Challenge Convention, Change our World

Verbal Expression

The motto of Clark University is "Challenge Convention, Change our World." But how does major societal change happen? What theories and paradigms exist to help us understand when change occurs or fails to occur? This course will use a series of case studies to introduce students to the analysis and theoretical dimensions of societal change within geography and allied social science disciplines. Among the cases we will study are the rise and fall in the popularity of living in cities, changing societal attitudes toward cigarette smoking, and the adoption of renewable energy technologies. Students will also have the opportunity to develop their own case studies, and will be presented with different ways of building capacity to lead and effect change. We will encourage social learning through dialogue and classroom discussions, lectures, multimedia presentations and guest speakers, capacity-building activities, and written assignments.

JAPN 110 - Japanese Pop Culture: Narratives of National Identity

Verbal Expression

We will examine popular culture in Japan - literature, film, anime, music, visual art - from the 80's to the present, for ways it both shapes and reflects issues of cultural and national identity. Engaging with theories of popular culture and globalization, we will explore the production, consumption, and export of popular culture narratives about Japan. Topics for consideration include: Japanese "uniqueness"; gender role (de-)construction; historical consciousness and collective memory; cross-cultural fandom; kawaii and the contradictions of technology. Fulfills the Verbal Expression requirement. You must be placed at the Verbal Expression level to be admitted into this seminar.

JS 117 - Reading the Narratives of the Hebrew Bible

Historical Perspective

The first half of the Hebrew Bible-the books of Genesis through Kings-is a central text of Western culture. But how are these texts to be read? As history, myth, religious program, foundation of Judaism, foundation of Christianity? Using the tools of comparative ancient Near eastern languages and cultures, the history of religion, literary analysis, and folklore, we will explore the Bible's many faces, and try to show how the answer to the question is close to "all of the above." We will also view the texts through the window of later interpretation among Jews and Christians, and see how many generations came to view themselves and their own story through the ones presented in the Bible. Fulfills the Historical Perspective requirement.

MATH 110 - Diving into Research : The Mathematics Behind Gene Regulation

Formal Analysis

This course will introduce the idea of mathematically modeling gene regulation in a developing organism. Students will learn how mathematicians work with biologist to design simple experiments and derive equations to model gene expression. We will also explore some of the computational approaches currently being implemented in modern biology, including bioinformatics, data processing, and parameter estimation. This one-year course will be an interactive experience for students interested in learning more about the interface of mathematics, computer science, and molecular biology. Note: This yearlong course is 0.5 unit per ssemester, and the full year is necessary to obtain credit. Math 110 does not satisfy any requirement of the Math major.

MATH 124 - Honors Calculus I

Formal Analysis

Two-course sequence for strong students with interest in mathematics, computer science, physics, and other natural sciences. Physics majors usually take MATH 124 simultaneously with PHYS 120 and MATH 125 simultaneously with PHYS 121 . Previous experience with calculus is recommended but not required. The honors calculus sequence covers much the same topics from calculus as the regular sequence ( MATH 120 , MATH 121 , MATH 122 ), but takes two semesters instead of three, and emphasizes both mathematical rigor and physical intuition. MATH 124 and MATH 125 fulfill the formal-analysis requirement.

MGMT 100 - The Art and Science of Management

Verbal Expression

This course is designed to encourage students to consider how business is embedded into the larger society. It will introduce students to basic management skills and the context in which they are applied. Whether a person is working in a complex organization, such as a bank, university, high-tech firm, hospital or manufacturer; participating in a student-run activity; volunteering for a local nonprofit; or working a summer job-management skills are necessary. For management majors and minors, the course provides an introduction to the topics they will study in greater depth in their future course work. For students not majoring in management, it provides an opportunity to learn basic skills that will be helpful in their current and future activities in organizations. The course structure includes readings, lecture, service learning, case analyses, role plays and experiential exercises. The course involves considerable interaction between the professor and students, and among students, because the practice of management is about people working with, listening to, and respecting people who have different backgrounds, experiences and opinions. This class fulfills the Verbal Expression requirement.

MGMT 104 - Introduction to Management Information Systems

Formal Analysis

Effective communication and management skills in today's technology driven organizations require that the individual possess a working knowledge of state-of-the art presentation software tools and a pragmatic understanding of both the organization's existing information tools as well as capabilities of those tools which exist outside of the organization. This course will introduce the student to state-of-the-art software through hands-on application of the most popular tools in use today with a conceptual foundation in information system technology from a management perspective. Emphasizes basic knowledge needed to understand the field of information systems. Topics include information and organization, database management, recent developments in computer technology and their effect on management, and information systems design and management. Fulfills the Formal Analysis requirement.

MUSC 021 - Making Music

Aesthetic Perspective

Fall 2015 FYI In this introductory first year intensive students will study the essentials of music through singing, playing and composing. Students will learn to read and write musical notation as well as participate in an ensemble. The course will emphasize music comprehension skills and analytical techniques by critiquing, creating and taking apart music from a broad spectrum of cultures and genres. Students will be exposed to music they have not heard before as well as become familiar with a host of tools necessary to comprehend and thoughtfully perform and critique a variety of different musics. This course is recommended for those interested in pursuing music as a minor or major. The course is a pre-requisite for MUSC 121 and additional participation in MUSC 170 Concert Choir is required.

PHIL 065 - Philosophical Conversations:

Verbal Expression

Fall 2015 Topic: Talking about Being Human. Philosophy 065 is a dialogue-based first year intensive course devoted to good conversations about things that matter. It is linked to the Higgins Humanities School's Fall Symposium Program and meets the Program of Liberal Studies VE requirement. Our topic this Fall is "Human Being - Being Human." People have thought about what it means to be human in a wide variety of ways, and each of these ways has important consequences. We will consider several alternative accounts of what it means to be human the problems to which each gives rise, and how one can cultivate one's own understanding of the matter.

PHIL 099 - The Universe in the University

Verbal Expression

In a modern university like Clark we can study most every aspect of the universe. How do these aspects fit together, if at all? Does the division of the university into natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities reflect a division in the universe at large? Or does it reflect a diversity of points of view? Does it exhibit the relative immaturity of some fields of study? Or might it mark bumps in the evolution of things which oblige different methods of inquiry? Do we know enough by now to say whether efforts at a unified and inclusive picture of inquiry and truth is possible or even desirable? Supplemented by short introductions to basic approaches to meaning and truth, reduction and emergence, we shall study four attempts to see the universe whole by providing a unified vision of the modes of inquiry across the university: E. O. Wilson's Consilience, E. Cassirer's An Essay on Man, J. Hoffmeyer's Signs of Meaning in the Universe, and E. Slingerland's What Science Offers the Humanities.

PHIL 104 - The AIDS Pandemic

Verbal Expression

The global AIDS pandemic presents a public health challenge of unprecedented dimensions -- a challenge which will test not only our scientific and medical establishments, but our commitment to social justice, professional fidelity, interpersonal solidarity and, especially, to the care of the world's poorest and most disadvantaged populations. This seminar will draw on the rich philosophical, biological, epidemiological, legal, medical, and sociological literatures in order to examine a number of the moral and public policy issues which have been raised by the AIDS pandemic. Particular attention is given to the issues raised by the pandemic in developing countries. Fulfills the Verbal Expression (VE) requirement. You must be placed at the Verbal Expression level to be admitted into this seminar.

PHIL 109 - Life and Times of David Hume

Verbal Expression

Can science give us certainty? Is suicide moral? Do we have a right to political rebellion? Can religion be rational? Can we argue about beauty? The questions we will discuss in PHIL 109 have in common that they were unsettling in the 17th- and 18th centuries. And maybe they still are today? What seemed like obvious answers to these questions prior to the Early Modern period had become unsatisfactory. We will discuss what makes ways of asking questions and finding answers particularly modern. Our focus will be on one particular contemporary of the Early Modern period: David Hume, who was perhaps the least shaken by the unsettling nature of the questions and by the lack of answers. His proposals earned him labels like "rebel," "sceptic," "infidel," and "heretic." But at the same time his successors showed great interest in his views. The class stresses hands-on historical and philosophical work. This means two things. (1) We will gain a skill set for interacting directly with Hume's texts and with other historical sources. (2) We will learn effective methods for arguing about difficult and unsettling questions. Hume's arguments about the role of science, the basis of morality, the rationality of religion, and other topics are still endorsed today and we will work on evaluating them.

PHYS 120 - Introductory Physics - Part I

Science Perspective

Problem-oriented course intended for science majors; coverage is more in-depth than PHYS110. Topics include Newtonian mechanics and laboratory methods. Course should be taken with MATH124 so the elements of calculus and its applications to physics can be treated at the same time. This course comprises of lectures, associated laboratories, and discussion sections.

PSCI 091 - The Politics of Food

Values Perspective

How are policies surrounding food production and nutrition developed? Who influences these policy decisions and in what ways? What are some of the consequences of these policies, as well as other efforts to promote healthy and sustainable food production? What are some of the ethical issues surrounding food production and consumption? How can we understand the recent rise in interest for local, organic food? Should the government actively promote these food choices? This class will explore these questions, studying the ways that the U.S. government designs and implements policies and programs to ensure an affordable and nutritionally adequate food supply. In the process, we will also look at some of the social, cultural, economic, ethical, and institutional factors that influence agriculture, food, and nutrition policies, programs, and choices.

PSCI 096 - Just and Unjust Wars

Values Perspective

This first-year seminar examines significant questions such as why states and societies go to war, whether doing so is ever justified, and what (if anything) might make it so. Students will be afforded the opportunity to explore a range of historical and contemporary armed conflicts through the lens of the political, moral, ethical, and legal criteria which constitute the basis of the 'laws of war' as well as the international conventions and norms derived from them. Particular attention will be paid to the dilemmas associated with the decision to go to war, conduct during war, and war's aftermath. Students will engage with these and related dilemmas through consideration of specific examples including (but not limited to) preemptive war, wars of self-defense, humanitarian intervention, peacekeeping and peace operations, terrorism and wars of national liberation, the status of non-combatants and non-state actors, and the rebuilding of post-conflict societies.

PSCI 144 - Religion and International Relations

Global Comparative Perspective

This course will introduce students to the theoretical approaches in international relations and their application for understanding the connection between religion, secularism, and international relations. Using historical and contemporary cases, the course examines the impact of religion, secularism, and globalization on interstate relations, war, and peace. Questions to be considered include: How do we understand religion's impact on international relations? How do religion and secularism affect state behavior? How do religion and secularism relate to globalization? The course will look at the relationship between religion and other aspects of international relations, including human rights, gender, nationalism, modernity, democracy, and ethnic conflict.

PSYC 020 - Topics in Men and Emotion

Values Perspective

One of the most pervasive gender stereotypes in Western societies is the belief that men "aren't emotional." In this inquiry-based seminar we will look at available scientific theory and research to determine just how accurate this stereotype is. Do men actually experience and express emotions differently than women? Is this true for all emotions or just some more than others? How can an enhanced understanding of the gendered nature of men's emotional experiences help us in promoting human well-being for both men and women? In addition to immersing ourselves in existing research, we will also carry out a new research study on masculine gender socialization and emotion. Students will be responsible for collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data focused on a research question that we will formulate early in the semester. Fulfills the Values perspective. First year students only.

PSYC 193 - Discourse, Identity, and the Critique of Romance

Language and Culture Perspective

This FYI explores how people make sense of themselves by what they say and how they say it ('discourse') - with a focus on the construction of a 'modern identity' and the sense of who we are in 'Late Modernity'. This particular semester we will focus on how the search for a unique sense of self that is 'recognized' by others is something that has resulted in modern times in more distant and 'cool' relationships vis- -vis 'the other'-especially in romantic relationships. Since this course carries the Language and Culture Perspective, it is expected that students will acquire the basic skills in linguistics necessary for the acquisition of some basic Maori, and some in-depth analyses of discourse. Students will be expected to commit themselves to a high-level academic atmosphere and to a challenging workload that will result in stimulating class discussions. Participation in Weekend Seminar required.

SOC 012 - Introduction to Sociology in a Global World

Global Comparative Perspective

Sociology is a discipline that studies the ways in which society shapes our lives, our relationships, and our identities. It traces the web of influence and connection that often escapes our notice because it falls beyond our immediate vision. In other words, much of what we experience (including such diverse activities as falling in love, getting a job, or committing a crime) can be shown to find its source and meaning in broader forces. Sociologists refer to these factors collectively as culture, social structure and history. In the past two decades, the scope and reach of these forces have broadened. We often refer to this trend as "globalization." Time and space have compressed and the world has become increasingly interconnected and interdependent. This course is designed to broaden your analytic vision to examine the historical roots and contemporary manifestations of identity culture and community in a world transformed by globalization. Fulfills the Global Perspective requirement Anticipated Terms Offered: Periodically

SOC 033 - Who Rules America?

Formal Analysis

G. William Domhoff's Who Rules America? (2014), originally published in 1967 and now in its seventh edition, uses empirical data to document its controversial assertions about the centralization of power in the hands of a "corporate community" in the United States. While enormous amounts of data are available on many of the topics that Domhoff addresses, he is only able to summarize the most basic data on any given topic. This presents us with a tremendous opportunity: the ability to incorporate empirical research projects that expand upon Domhoff's analyses in this class. In his early chapters, Domhoff uses data to document the existence of a corporate community. Later he spends considerable time documenting a variety of ways that this elite group uses its economic power to gain political power. Specifically, he discusses (1) a policy planning network, comprised of corporate-funded foundations and think tanks, that tries to shape national policy-making to serve corporate interests; (2) the corporate funding of political action committees, designed to support the election/reelection of pro-corporate legislators; and (3) corporate lobbying expenditures, designed to encourage elected officials to support legislation of interest to the corporate community. We will do original "power structure research" on all of these aspects of Domhoff's argument