Graduate School of Geography Articles & Blogs

Landscape of dead trees next to water, with mountains in background
November 1, 2016
For the first time, new research has compared the impact of bark beetle outbreaks versus climate on the occurrence of large wildfires across the entire western United States. The Clark University study points to climate, not beetles, as the main culprit, suggesting new approaches to managing forests and preventing...
Thomas Kühne,David Pijawka, Judy Dworkin and Jody Emel, seated in chairs, talk about issues in "Indian country."
October 19, 2016
Alumni Judy Dworkin, PhD ’78, and David Pijawka, PhD ’83, recently returned to Clark University to talk about their experiences in Arizona working with American Indians. Their talk, titled “The Challenges in Indian Country in the 21st Century: Planning, Law and Community,” was sponsored by the Graduate School of Geography...
Isabel Miranda '17 - Hawaii
August 26, 2016
Isabel Miranda '17 (foreground) during her NOAA fellowship. Not every college student gets to enjoy a summer in Hawaii, but that's where Isabel Miranda '17 was over the past few months — although she didn't spend her days relaxing on the beach or riding the waves.
HERO (Human-Environment Regional Observatory) Fellows
July 18, 2016
Five Clark University undergraduate students on yearlong HERO (Human-Environment Regional Observatory) fellowships presented their research last week on how trees in the Worcester area are faring several years after the invasion of the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB). The research opportunity epitomizes Clark’s LEEP (Liberal...
Bernadette Arakwiye, Clark University, doing field work in Rwanda
June 28, 2016
Thanks to high-resolution satellite imagery provided by the DigitalGlobe Foundation, Clark doctoral student Bernadette Arakwiye can now see the forest AND the individual trees (plus trails and village buildings) in her approximately 860-square-mile study area in the Gishwati and Mukura forests of western Rwanda. The...
Francis Lelo speaks during Clark University's 2015 commencement
June 22, 2016
When Francis Lelo, Ph.D. ’94, was a boy in rural Kenya, the local school was seven kilometers from his home. His family had no access to a vehicle, and the teachers punished any tardiness with a smack across the backside with a cane. The clear benefits of punctuality meant that simply walking to school was not an option.
HERO (Human-Environment Regional Observatory) Fellows for 2016 at Clark University
June 3, 2016
The Asian longhorned beetle Five Clark University undergraduates recently joined a fight against a common enemy of tree lovers in Worcester and beyond: the Asian longhorned beetle. Imported to the United States via infested wood pallets from China and Korea in the 1980s, the invasive pest was discovered to have killed...
GIS image of gypsy moth movement mapped across United States
April 20, 2016
J. Ronald Eastman remembers arriving at Clark University in 1981 as a visiting professor. The chair of the Geography Department handed him a computer – the first one in the department – to use in cartography classes. “It looked like a glorified Etch-a-Sketch screen,” recalled Eastman (pictured). “Nobody knew what to do...
Jonas Clark Hall - Clark University
October 12, 2015
Luke Trusel, postdoctoral scholar at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, stands near sea ice covered in melt ponds at McMurdo Station in Antarctica, in 2010. Trusel received a Ph.D. in geography at Clark University in 2014.
Jonas Clark Hall - Clark University
April 21, 2015
On April 8, Clark University graduate students came together to celebrate and showcase the work of 65 of their peers across ten of the University’s graduate departments and divisions. An annual event, the Graduate Student Multidisciplinary Conference (MDC) includes oral presentations as well as a poster session. Open to...
Fire and Ice - Clark University
May 5, 2013
For centuries, human beings — from poets to religious leaders to scientists — have speculated about the end of the world. Will it conclude with a whimper or a bang? Will we be consumed by fire or slowly freeze to death? These fatal visions reflect our instinctive fear of a climate that's either "too hot" or "too cold" for...

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