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FYI Course Descriptions

ARTH 158 - Art and the City of Worcester

Aesthetic Perspective

This class is an introduction to art history, using the rich trove of art collections within the city of Worcester as primary objects of study. Each week we will be immersed in the art of a specific time and place, reading relevant articles and then examining, in person, actual examples of art from the period. Over the course of the semester, we will visit the collections of the Worcester Art Museum, the American Antiquarian Society, and the Higgins Armory Museum, and will also study several examples of public art in the city. By the end of the semester, students will have gained a foundation in art history and will also have come to know the City of Worcester in greater depth. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective requirement.

ARTS 102 - Drawing: Eye, Mind, Hand

Aesthetic Perspective

Addresses the mechanics and expressive potential of drawing. Traditional illusionist drawing techniques will be combined with exercises that facilitate personal expression and subjective response. In exploring the relationship among seeing, thinking and making, the beginning student will acquire fundamental skills in image making and insight into the creative process in general. Each faculty member will bring his/her unique perspective and personal studio practices to bear in the teaching of this course. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective.

BIOL 101 - Introduction to Biology I

Science Perspective

This course provides an introduction to biology appropriate for those interested in general biology, genetics, and cellular-level biology, or who are contemplating a career in the health sciences. It is designed with three general goals in mind: (1) to provide students with an understanding of the unifying themes in modern biology, (2) to introduce students to the diversity of life forms at all levels of organization, and (3) to illustrate the methods and modes of scientific inquiry in the biological sciences. Students are introduced to principles of evolution and genetics. Fulfills the Science Perspective.

BIOL 103 - Environmental and Conservation Biology

Science Perspective

This course provides an introduction to biology appropriate for those interested in environmental and conservation biology. It is designed with three general goals in mind: (1) to provide students with an understanding of the unifying themes in modern biology, (2) to introduce students to the diversity of life forms at all levels of organization, and (3) to illustrate the methods and modes of scientific inquiry in the biological sciences. Students are introduced to principles of evolution, genetics, behavior and ecology. Satisfies BIOL 101 requirement for the biology major and is one of three core requirements for the environmental science major. Fulfills the Science Perspective.

CHEM 101 - Introductory Chemistry I

Science Perspective

This course is designed to meet the needs of science majors with an interest in chemistry, biochemistry, biology, or environmental science and students with an interest in the health professions. It will introduce students to fundamental chemical concepts dealing with the structure, bonding, and reactivity of molecules. Major topics include thermochemistry, ideal gas theory, chemical periodicity, and bonding and geometry of molecules. The laboratory sections introduce students to the techniques of chemical experimentation and the methods of chemical analysis needed for chemistry and other sciences. Knowledge of high-school algebra is necessary; high-school chemistry and physics are helpful, but not required. Registration includes a pre-lecture meeting time one day a week. Must register for one laboratory section.

CHEM 103 - Accelerated Introductory Chemistry

Science Perspective

This is a one-semester course for students with a strong background in chemistry who do not need the traditional two-semester sequence. Upon completion of CHEM 103, students are eligible to go directly to CHEM 131 - Organic Chemistry I , thereby accelerating their program in chemistry by one semester and allowing for additional elective courses during their junior and senior years. Topics include atomic and molecular structure, geometry, bonding, reactions, equilibria, thermodynamics, acids and bases, basic kinetics and stoichiometry.

ECON 010 - Economics and the World Economy

Global Comparative Perspective

This course provides an introduction to international economic interactions and the macroeconomic analysis of economies. The course develops basic economic concepts including market analysis, trade, and demand and supply in the macroeconomy. Comparisons across countries provide a deeper understanding of business cycles, unemployment, monetary policy, economic growth, currencies and fiscal policy. These economic concepts provide tools to analyze current issues such as economic stability, debt crises and policies towards trade. Open to first-year students. Fulfills the global comparative perspective.

EDUC 060 - Public Schools and Democracy

Historical Perspective

From Colonial times to the present, Americans have looked to free public education to be the main instrument for all citizens to access political maturity and equality, as well as economic opportunity. In 1848, educator Horace Mann wrote: "Education ... is the great equalizer of the conditions of men the balance wheel of the social machinery." In this seminar, using primary documents-laws, reports, and court decisions both historical and contemporary, we will explore both the historical context and, especially, the current realities in public schools, to determine how effective they have been and are at present in carrying out this crucial responsibility.

ENG 116 - The Secret Lives of Books

Historical Perspective

Sometimes you can judge a book by its cover, not to mention judging by its ink and paper, by its typeface and layout, even by damage or by marks left by earlier readers. Books tell stories with the words printed inside them, of course, but they also tell stories just by being physical objects. In this course, students will learn to become book sleuths. Readings and seminar discussions on the history and theory of the book will be enhanced by a series of hands-on workshops at Special Collections as well as off-campus field trips. While the full scope of the class extends from the earliest periods of the written word through current-day digital advances, emphasis will be given to specific historical periods (the development of moveable type, the proliferation of print in the early hand-press period, mechanization during the Industrial Revolution, changing paradigms of electronic textuality today) in order to understand the interplay of technology, culture, and society over time.

ENG 122 - Terror of the Gothic

Verbal Expression

In this course, we will explore our delight in terror through the world of nineteenth-century Gothic fiction, novels like Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and Bram Stoker's Dracula, a world of pain and destruction, fear and anxiety. In tracing the recurrent themes of sin, family dynamics, politics, and nature within Gothic fiction, we will examine both the relationship of this fiction to the dominant culture of the nineteenth century, as well as to social and political revolution. Following current literary scholarship, we will pose questions about representations of violence; the significance of fantasy and fear; and the role of gender, race, class and sexuality in this body of work. Throughout the course, we will examine the legacy of this fiction in our modern cultural obsession with horror through film. This course satisfies the Verbal Expression (VE) requirement. First-Year Intensive.

ENT 105 - Creating a Culture of Innovation

Values Perspective

Are creativity and innovation synonymous? How do you create and support a culture of innovation? This course will combine theory and experiential assignments to introduce students to the concepts of creatvity and innovation as a source of social change. Students will gain a greater understanding of and appreciation for the creative/innovative processes and learn how to harness and direct those forces for themselves and others. This course will help prepare students to contribute in a unique and productive way to today's entrepreneurial, societal, and organizational demands.

GEOG 179 - Global and Local Environmental Justice

Values Perspective

Integrates ecology, culture and political economy from local to global scale through case studies. Starts from a view of people in environmental "hot spots," following links to world economy and planetary ecosystems. Explores connections of international environmental, economic and social policy with everyday realities and possible futures of people from the Amazon rain forest to the streets of Worcester. Fulfills the Values Perspective (VP) requirement. Normally offered as lecture/discussion course and offered occasionally as First Year Seminar, in which case the VE or VP requirement can be fulfilled. The FYI version in Fall 2014 will offer hands on field research to support local solutions to pollution along the Tatnuck Brook and specifically Coes Pond, as well as a module on local/global food connections and three international case studies of local and global resistance to environmental damage and resource depletion by indigenous peoples, peasants and community organizations from forest and agrarian landscapes to urban neighborhoods.

HIST 037 - 19th-Century America Through Women's Eyes

Historical Perspective

How is our understanding of the past transformed when we look at it through women's eyes? This seminar explores the major developments of 19th-century American history industrialization, slavery, westward expansion, immigration, and reform, as captured in women's narrative writings, diaries, letters, autobiographies and autobiographical fiction. Its goals are three-fold: to introduce students to history as a lively scholarly discipline (as opposed to a timeless and fixed story of the past); to familiarize students with the central questions of women's history; and to train students in the reading, analysis and critique of primary sources. What will emerge at the end of our investigation is an understanding of the ways in which the experience and production of history are shaped by gender and, in turn, how the experience and production of gender are shaped by history. Fulfills the Historical Perspective.

HIST 048 - Baseball and American Society

Historical Perspective

This course will use the story of baseball to illuminate key themes and issues in U.S. history. These include urbanization; mass media, transportation, and culture; immigration and assimilation; race and civil rights legal issues; labor struggles; and globalization. This course will emphasize critical analysis, especially how to interpret sources, from written texts to photographs, films, cartoons, and music, and will include several field trips. HIST 048 carries an HP designation.

ID 104 - Experiencing the American City

Values Perspective

This course will take a phenomenological approach to "experience the city," to how people feel the city, while seeking to grow fundamental skills to enhance and develop the ability of students to appreciate, feel, and do grounded work in the city. The course will be divided into four modules: 1) Working in the City; 2) Observing the City; 3) Researching the City; 4) Feeling the City. The first module delves into the meaning of becoming a professional working in cities by showing potential professional pathways to students relying on the real-life experience of Clark alumni, and exploring mentorship and summer internship opportunities. The second module will focus on enhancing students' "natural observation" abilities, a fundamental skill of good urban planners. The third module will focus on the basics of formulating good (applied) research questions about urban problems. The final module will touch upon some of the rich expressions, symbols, and images which urban life inspires by examining literary, musical, and culinary arts in the city. The course will rely on field work in some cities of Massachusetts. Students interested in working in multicultural, multi-ethnic environments and with diverse populations are particularly encouraged to take the course, as well as students of diverse ethnic/racial and social backgrounds.

ID 106 - Healthy Cities

Global Comparative Perspective

What makes a city a healthy place to live, work, and go to school? How does the health of a "place" affect the health of the individuals who live there? Who is responsible for the health of a city's residents? The goal of this course is to introduce students to key challenges in urban public health and to Worcester, MA as a city determined to be the "the healthiest city in New England by 2020" in Worcester, MA. Students in the course will acquire an understanding of the key concepts and methodologies from a range of disciplines, including anthropology, sociology, and public health, and how they employ those tools to examine urban health problems. Students in this course will explore and engage in a wide range of topics related to healthy cities. This is an entry course to the newly established collaboration between Clark and the Worcester Division of Public Health. Students who enroll in this class will get in-depth exposure to issues related to healthy cities, rights to the city, and environmental and urban issues that can potentially impact (positively or negatively) the health of its residents. Health, here, of course will be considered as "a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity" (WHO 1948). Students will have to critically reflect on reading material, but will also be introduced to interpreting basic health data and relating it to the urban environment in which they live. They will also get the opportunity to interact with public health professionals from the Department of Public Health, and apply through field trips what they learn in class to the real world.

IDND 011 - Making a Difference

Verbal Expression

This course will offer a scholarly perspective on "making a difference," defined as the many varieties of social change ranging from philanthropy to political activism. Students will analyze how others have made a difference in a range of times and places, and will learn skills to make a difference at three levels: in their lives, on the Clark campus, and in the city of Worcester. This is a multi-disciplinary course in which readings will be derived from the fields of sociology, psychology, community development, urban studies, education, social policy, and political science. Themes of personal growth, leadership, collaboration, and activism will be explored. In addition to writing assignments, students will be expected to participate actively in class discussions and experiential exercises, as well as complete a structured service placement in a neighborhood agency. The concluding assignment will be a proposal for community-based social change activity.

IDND 021 - Queer Horror

Verbal Expression

From Frankenstein to Freddy Krueger, the horror monster has thrilled and terrified horror fans for decades. What the general audience might not recognize is how the monster embodies society's anxieties, particularly those involving sexuality and gender. In this class, we will analyze a selection of horror novels and films, paying attention to how the monsters are "coded" as queer, exploring how the monsters are representations of popular culture's changing views on queerness, and considering how and why the queer monster has evolved over the decades. We will also consider how a queer audience might have responded to these monsters.

IDND 087 - Challenge Convention, Change our World

Verbal Expression

The motto of Clark University is Challenge Convention, Change our World. But how does major societal change happen? What theories and paradigms exist to help us understand when change occurs or fails to occur? This course will use a series of case studies to introduce students to the analysis and theoretical dimensions of societal change within geography and allied social science disciplines. Among the cases we will study are the rise and fall in the popularity of living in cities, changing societal attitudes toward cigarette smoking, and the adoption of renewable energy technologies. Students will also have the opportunity to develop their own case studies, and will be presented with different ways of building capacity to lead and effect change. We will encourage social learning through dialogue and classroom discussions, lectures, multimedia presentations and guest speakers, capacity-building activities, and written assignments.

JAPN 190 - Japanese Women Writers

Verbal Expression

Explores Japanese poetry and prose in translation, from the literary tradition of 10th- through 11th-century Japan, through the reawakening of women writers in the early modern period to contemporary writers popular both in Japan and abroad. Emphasis is on the cultural context of author and audience and the changing role of women in Japanese society.

MGMT 100 - The Art and Science of Management

Verbal Expression

This course is designed to encourage students to consider how business is embedded into the larger society. It will introduce students to basic management skills and the context in which they are applied. Whether a person is working in a complex organization, such as a bank, university, high-tech firm, hospital or manufacturer; participating in a student-run activity; volunteering for a local nonprofit; or working a summer job management skills are necessary. For management majors and minors, the course provides an introduction to the topics they will study in greater depth in their future course work. For students not majoring in management, it provides an opportunity to learn basic skills that will be helpful in their current and future activities in organizations. The course structure includes readings, lecture, service learning, case analyses, role plays and experiential exercises. The course involves considerable interaction between the professor and students, and among students, because the practice of management is about people working with, listening to, and respecting people who have different backgrounds, experiences and opinions. This class fulfills the Verbal Expression requirement.

MGMT 104 - Introduction to Management Information Systems

Formal Analysis

Effective communication and management skills in today s technology driven organizations require that the individual possess a working knowledge of state-of-the art presentation software tools and a pragmatic understanding of both the organization s existing information tools as well as capabilities of those tools which exist outside of the organization. This course will introduce the student to state-of-the-art software through hands-on application of the most popular tools in use today with a conceptual foundation in information system technology from a management perspective. Emphasizes basic knowledge needed to understand the field of information systems. Topics include information and organization, database management, recent developments in computer technology and their effect on management, and information systems design and management. Fulfills the Formal Analysis requirement.

PHIL 065 - Talking: Narrative

Verbal Expression

PHIL 065 is about storytelling and narrative. People tell stories for many reasons. Of course stories are fun and express who we are, but they also establish the world we inhabit and orient us to it. Stories convey information, define who we are, and establish relationships. Some of them claim to tell the truth of things, while others are fictitious. But they all connect us with our cultures and histories. Stories can bring people together; and they can separate them. They show us where we belong and how we are distinctive. In all these ways stories raise important philosophical issues: Who are we? What is true, and how do we know that it is? How should we live? In Talking Narrative we will address these and other issues, exploring what narrative is and its many uses. Because PHIL 065 carries a VE designation, we will write expository essays as well as narratives of several kinds. Because it is a Difficult Dialogues course, our class meetings will be conducted as dialogues. PHIL 065 is linked to Clark's Higgins School of the Humanities.

PHIL 100 - The Good Life

Values Perspective

Healthy human beings want to be happy. We want to live good lives. But what can a person do to live a good life? What makes one life good and another not so good? What makes one person happy and another not? Are there significant connections between health, well-being, social involvement, ethical endeavor, worldly achievement, felt satisfaction, and living a good life? In this seminar we will use philosophical, psychological, religious, and literary works to explore some of the ways that human beings organize their lives, set fundamental goals and standards, and try to assess these. Our seminar will examine a range of possible life aims including the search for pleasure, cultivating personal excellence, the pursuit of wealth and power, contributing to the public good, ecological attunement, spiritual fulfillment, and having no aim at all.

PHIL 104 - The AIDS Pandemic

Verbal Expression

The global AIDS pandemic presents a public health challenge of unprecedented dimensions -- a challenge which will test not only our scientific and medical establishments, but our commitment to social justice, professional fidelity, interpersonal solidarity and, especially, to the care of the world's poorest and most disadvantaged populations. This seminar will draw on the rich philosophical, biological, epidemiological, legal, medical, and sociological literatures in order to examine a number of the moral and public policy issues which have been raised by the AIDS pandemic. Particular attention is given to the issues raised by the pandemic in developing countries. Fulfills the Verbal Expression (VE) requirement. You must be placed at the Verbal Expression level to be admitted into this seminar.

PHYS 120 - Introductory Physics - Part I

Science Perspective

Problem-oriented course intended for science majors; coverage is more in-depth than PHYS110. Topics include Newtonian mechanics and laboratory methods. Course should be taken with MATH124 so the elements of calculus and its applications to physics can be treated at the same time. This course comprises of lectures, associated laboratories, and discussion sections.

PSCI 097 - The International Relations of Sports

Global Comparative Perspective

Political Scientists spend considerable time researching and interpreting the relationships between nation-states, primarily international conflict and cooperation. Sports are one way to demonstrate those relationships between states. One need only think of the Olympic Games and the FIFA World Cup, for example, to reflect how players and spectators interpret sports within the context of national identities and international rivalries. Moreover, the international relations of sports is also gendered. With its focus on physical strength, camaraderie and competition, sports have long been understood as a benchmark for masculinity. This course will explore and examine several facets that connect the Political Science subfield/discipline of international relations with sports: globalization, diplomacy, war/conflict, identity and place, and the intersectionality of race, ethnicity, and gender.

PSYC 020 - Topics in Men and Emotion

Values Perspective

One of the most pervasive gender stereotypes in Western societies is the belief that men aren't emotional. In this inquiry-based seminar we will look at available scientific theory and research to determine just how accurate this stereotype is. Do men actually experience and express emotions differently than women? Is this true for all emotions or just some more than others? How can an enhanced understanding of the gendered nature of men's emotional experiences help us in promoting human well-being for both men and women? In addition to immersing ourselves in existing research, we will also carry out a new research study on masculine gender socialization and emotion. Students will be responsible for collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data focused on a research question that we will formulate early in the semester. Fulfills the Values perspective. First year students only.

PSYC 193 - Discourse, Romance, Self, and the Search for "Recognition"

Language and Culture Perspective

This FYI explores how people make sense of themselves by what they say and how they say it ('discourse') - with a focus on the construction of a 'modern identity' and the sense of who we are in 'Late Modernity'. This particular semester we will focus on how the search for a unique sense of self that is 'recognized' by others is something that has resulted in modern times in more distant and 'cool' relationships vis- -vis 'the other' especially in romantic relationships. Since this course carries the Language and Culture Perspective, it is expected that students will acquire the basic skills in linguistics necessary for the acquisition of some basic Maori, and some in-depth analyses of discourse. Students will be expected to commit themselves to a high-level academic atmosphere and to a challenging workload that will result in stimulating class discussions. Must register for discussion section. Participation in Weekend Seminar required. Fulfills the Language and Culture Perspective requirement.

SCRN 123 - Factual Film and Television

Aesthetic Perspective

Found Footage FYI Fall 2014 Focusing on the recent found-footage craze in film and television, this seminar theorizes the various tactics through which contemporary media deceive audiences precisely by telling the truth--delivering content that seduces by appearing actual, or "really real." Beginning with a close reading of four notable found-footage films--The Blair Witch Project (1999), Paranormal Activity (2007), Cloverfield (2008) and Chronicle (2012)--we will go on to establish the historical, aesthetic, and generic contexts that have made such films possible. Special attention will be paid to media texts that are notorious for having taken liberties with the truth, such as Nanook of the North (1922), "The War of the Worlds" radio drama (1938), David Holzman's Diary (1967), F for Fake (1973), The Thin Blue Line (1988), and Ghostwatch (1992, TV). During the last five weeks of the course, the seminar will shift into a hands-on workshop phase, in which students will conceive, write, shoot, and edit their own short found-footage pseudo-documentary--a film that is wholly fictional yet purports to be real--to be screened publicly at a December event in Razzo Hall. Students wishing to enroll should note that this is not in any sense a "film appreciation" course, but instead a serious, rigorous course in Film and Media Studies. The major workload of the seminar will comprise a series of written analyses based on weekly screenings, in which students will grapple not only with narrative (i.e. scripted plots), but also with the intricacies of film form (i.e., editing, sound, cinematography, lighting, production design, and so on).

SOC 033 - Who Rules America?

Formal Analysis

G. William Domhoff's Who Rules America? (2014), originally published in 1967 and now in its seventh edition, uses empirical data to document its controversial assertions about the centralization of power in the hands of a "corporate community" in the United States. While enormous amounts of data are available on many of the topics that Domhoff addresses, he is only able to summarize the most basic data on any given topic. This presents us with a tremendous opportunity: the ability to incorporate empirical research projects that expand upon Domhoff's analyses in this class. In his early chapters, Domhoff uses data to document the existence of a corporate community. Later he spends considerable time documenting a variety of ways that this elite group uses its economic power to gain political power. Specifically, he discusses (1) a policy planning network, comprised of corporate-funded foundations and think tanks, that tries to shape national policy-making to serve corporate interests; (2) the corporate funding of political action committees, designed to support the election/reelection of pro-corporate legislators; and (3) corporate lobbying expenditures, designed to encourage elected officials to support legislation of interest to the corporate community. We will do original "power structure research" on all of these aspects of Domhoff's argument