major-philosophy-program-clark-university

Major or Minor in Philosophy

Understanding ourselves and our place in the world

As a philosophy major, you seek answers to the fundamental questions of human existence: What is the meaning of life? What is reality? What is truth? What is the nature of good and evil?

While mastering classic texts from ancient times to the present on these subjects, you cultivate clear and focused writing, analytical and problem-solving skills, and, in general, disciplined and effective thinking. The analytical tools that philosophy cultivates will serve you well as you seek to make sound decisions in a wide variety of life situations.

In fact, philosophy is an ideal liberal-arts degree. Increasingly, employers in all fields recognize the value of hiring graduates with degrees in areas of study—like philosophy—that emphasize writing skills, creative thinking, and conceptual rigor. In a 2012 study by the Educational Testing Service, philosophy majors scored higher than any other majors on the Verbal and Analytical Writing sections of the GRE, and higher than any other humanities major in the Quantitative sections.

Why Study Philosophy at Clark?

  • Join a tight-knit community of philosophy majors and faculty who don’t shy away from challenging and stimulating debates over fundamental questions.
  • Learn from experts in subfields of philosophy, including social and political philosophy, ancient Greek philosophy, modern European philosophy, the philosophy of psychology, cognitive science, environmental ethics, biomedical ethics, existentialism and more.
  • Gain exposure to broad, traditional philosophical topics such as the history of philosophy, epistemology and metaphysics, and ethics and political philosophy, and choose courses that examine more specialized topics, such as environmental ethics, artificial intelligence, Plato, Kant, philosophy of law, and the philosophy of art.
  • Along with the philosophy faculty, philosophy majors share a dedicated campus home at Beck House, named for former Clark professor Robert N. Beck.