Science with Impact Articles & Blogs

Stephen Steinbrecher and President David P. Angel with alumni Steinbrecher and Anton fellows
June 27, 2016
When Ali Canino ’12 saw the campground for the first time, her heart sank. Due to severe drought, Sioux YMCA’s Camp Marrowbone in north-central South Dakota had not been used in seven years, and it was a disaster. The buildings were falling down, there were no bathrooms, barbed wire was everywhere and the electrical...
Shiitake mushrooms at left; David Hibbett, Clark University professor of biology, at right
June 23, 2016
David Hibbett Over the past decade, specialty mushrooms, especially shiitake, have won over Americans. Renowned food writer and Clark University alumnus Mark Bittman '71 hailed the increased availability of shiitake for American cooks. Meanwhile, a Boston chef-turned-wholesaler recalled that in the 1990s, “nobody knew...
Jake Kramer talks to computer science students while holding an Amazon Echo speaker; visiting professor and former Amazon manager Kenneth Basye watches from the audience
June 21, 2016
When students at more than 1,000 colleges and universities ranked the companies where they’d like to work, the top six probably drew little surprise: Google, Apple, Microsoft, Facebook, Intel and Amazon. You’ll find Clark University graduates at all of these top picks, and over the past several years, Clark computer...
Tree in Australia damaged by drought
June 8, 2016
  Scientists predict that 2016 is on track to become the hottest year on record. They estimate that record-breaking temperatures will stem in part from the current El Niño event, which affects weather worldwide. But they say climate change is also playing a role this year, just as it has for “the previous 17 record-...
Clark University Antarctic Researcher Luke Trusel
June 1, 2016
Though nearly 10,000 miles from Worcester, Massachusetts, Antarctica holds a significant place in the history and lore of Clark University. Today, ongoing scientific research by Clark-affiliated researchers is again focused on Antarctica. They want to more clearly define the true threat of global warming – and how quickly...
Clownfish in coral reef
May 13, 2016
Faye Harwell ’15, MS’16, has some words of advice for Clark University’s three Marsh-Mosakowski National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Fellows this summer: You never know how you’ll end up using the invaluable experience gained through a research project for NOAA. Take larval samples. Harwell encountered...
2016-17 Steinbrecher Fellows at Clark University
April 28, 2016
Eight Clark University undergraduate students were recently awarded Steinbrecher Fellowships to support their pursuit of original ideas, creative research and community service projects this summer and during the 2016-2017 academic year. The students (five are pictured above) and their projects include:
GIS image of gypsy moth movement mapped across United States
April 20, 2016
J. Ronald Eastman remembers arriving at Clark University in 1981 as a visiting professor. The chair of the Geography Department handed him a computer – the first one in the department – to use in cartography classes. “It looked like a glorified Etch-a-Sketch screen,” recalled Eastman (pictured). “Nobody knew what to do...
Coastal flooding
April 15, 2016
Robert Johnston, Clark University professor of economics and director of the George Perkins Marsh Institute, shared insights into his research in a recent talk, “The Economics of Sea Level Rise, Coastal Vulnerability and Adaptation: Choices and Tradeoffs in New England.” 
Ramallah, city in Palestine
April 14, 2016
If you’re wondering how research skills learned at Clark University can be put to good use in solving a problem halfway across the world, then look no further than Safaa Karaki Aldwaik M.A. '07, M.A. '10, Ph.D. '12.
Threespine stickleback fish
April 7, 2016
As a recipient on an $8.7 million grant from the John Templeton Foundation, Clark University will be a major participant in the world’s largest coordinated, multi-national project on the study of evolution. The research could fundamentally shift our understanding of the evolutionary process. The University will receive $...
March 30, 2016
Session One of Clark's Climate Change Teach-in 2016 on March 23 entailed several "new Earth conversations" framed by the question "What is changing, and why?" Faculty from many disciplines offered insights and perspectives on a variety of climate-change topics. Among the teach-in faculty was Karen Frey, associate professor...
Image of data mapping seasonal trends in vegetation in United States
March 29, 2016
An ongoing debate in the scientific community — one that GOP presidential candidate Ted Cruz and others have used to reject human-induced climate change — involves an apparent decade-long "hiatus" in global warming.
Researchers walking toward satellite dish in the forest
March 20, 2016
The work of the Marsh Institute is informed by a fundamental question: What is and ought to be our relationship with nature? The institute uses both fundamental and use-inspired research to help answer this question.
Binary code image
March 19, 2016
Over the years, Clark’s computer servers have earned nicknames honoring Greek gods, Disney characters, and even some famous rappers. But when it came to tagging the university’s most powerful supercomputer cluster, the technology defied easy categorization. So it’s simply the “cluster” that churns through programs and...
Rob Drewell
March 19, 2016
From left, Professors John Gibbons, Jackie Dresch and Rob Drewell. To hear John Gibbons talk about bioinformatics, you’d think this trend in the sciences is relatively straightforward. "Historically, if you used a computer to analyze biological data, it was considered bioinformatics," he says. But Gibbons, an assistant...
Artword of person's head
February 22, 2016
Dr. Richard Pietras ’69 pioneered a groundbreaking treatment for breast cancer. Now he is taking on the growing epidemic of lung cancer in women.
Arshad Kudrolli Physics
January 25, 2016
Dynamical jamming might sound like the latest music craze to hit Clark University, but it's actually cutting-edge technology that one day might enhance the fit of prosthetic limbs.
Professor Todd Livdahl (left) travels to Bermuda every other year with a team of students to closely investigate several mosquito species and to observe the country’s efforts to control them.
November 21, 2015
A whole lot of people would cheer any efforts to control the pesky mosquitoes that can turn any picnic into a swat fest. But for some countries, mosquito control is a matter of life and death. Biology professor Todd Livdahl has found that very scenario in Bermuda. While accompanying Clark biology students at the Bermuda...
October 12, 2015
Clark University Psychology Department professor and chair James V. Cordova Clark University Professor James V. Córdova, chair of the Psychology Department, may not be a household name — yet — but his research and comments featured recently in The Wall Street Journal nearly have gone viral.
October 12, 2015
Luke Trusel, postdoctoral scholar at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, stands near sea ice covered in melt ponds at McMurdo Station in Antarctica, in 2010. Trusel received a Ph.D. in geography at Clark University in 2014.
Biologist David Hibbet
September 25, 2015
Whether bees or bacteria, hyenas or humans, all known life forms have a place in the first draft of the Open Tree of Life, published online last week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Molds and mushrooms haven’t been left out either, thanks in part to the work of Clark professor and fungal...
July 10, 2015
The 2014-2015 academic year saw Clark University computer science students make their debut at the annual Association for Computing Machinery International Collegiate Programming Contest (ICPC), described in their Fact Sheet as "the premiere global programming competition conducted by and for the world's universities." The...
February 24, 2015
Top projects include agraponic food systems, a campus pub, and help for students struggling academically
The future has arrived - Clark University
October 27, 2014
Technology loves a void. It helps us do many things faster and more efficiently than ever imagined by previous generations. It can be deployed for purposes as miraculous as saving lives or as routine as amusing ourselves for hours on end. In a kind of endless loop, technology is both responsible and responsive — driving...