Science with Impact Articles & Blogs

Colin Sterling - Clark University
October 2, 2017
When Dr. Richard Pietras ’69 was a biology student at Clark University, he achieved two firsts that launched his lifetime of research: his first federal funding, a National Science Foundation undergraduate student grant, and his first scientific report, in neurobiology. “The study was focused on the potential role of...
Christie Joyce - Clark University
October 2, 2017
As an undergraduate biology major and chemistry minor at Clark University, Christie Joyce ’16, M.S.’17, worked in research laboratories on campus. She wanted to explore career options besides academia and research, as well as address a gap at Clark, so she founded a research journal managed, edited, designed and produced...
Students and faculty in the Summer Science Program stand on the steps outside Jefferson building
September 14, 2017
More than 40 undergraduate students participated in Clark’s Summer Science Research Program, which featured weekly lectures and mentorship by faculty. “One of the many positive aspects of this program was the bringing together of students, and faculty, from very different fields,” says Denis Larochelle, associate professor...
Sherief Eldeeb demonstrates how he attaches electrodes to the scalp of a young woman to test EEGs in the brain
September 8, 2017
In just three years at Clark University, Sherief Eldeeb ’18 has completed significant research projects in psychology. He’s examined topics ranging from the disparities in mental health care for Arab-Americans, to sleep problems and attention issues in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). About Sherief Eldeeb ’18...
Lucyna Kogut works in the lab
September 5, 2017
Lucyna Kogut ’18 chose Clark University because “I knew I wanted to be surrounded by people who were passionate about something. It didn’t matter what it was.” In her first semester here, however, she hadn’t yet identified her passion — and especially never thought it would be science. “I wasn’t sure what I wanted to do,”...
Nunnemacher Magazine - Clark University
August 30, 2017
Professor Rudolph Nunnemacher emerged from his office carrying the lens of a whale’s eye. The electricity to the biology building was temporarily out of service, and he had just the remedy to brighten the darkness. He said to me, ‘Come watch this,’ remembers Michael Rosenzweig ’85, who followed obediently to the door of...
Bernny Ramirez looking at earthworm through glass tank
August 24, 2017
Scientists often borrow from nature when developing some of their best ideas. Look no further than earthworms. Their squiggly, tunneling movements have already inspired researchers to dream up robots that could inch along the ground in military reconnaissance missions, or create devices that could thread their way through...
Nikolay Ionkin seated on chair before chalkboard with numbers
August 18, 2017
Ever since he was a boy playing with toy cars, Nikolay Ionkin ’18 has had a fascination with things that go. He imagined himself working in the automotive industry, but he never thought that physics might help him get there. A high school teacher convinced him otherwise. And when he entered Clark, he began taking physics...
Students in John Gibbons' PoP class standing in lab
August 1, 2017
Five undergraduate and two master’s degree students who completed Clark University’s spring biology course titled “The Genome Project” have received the ultimate feedback for their research and coursework: vetting of their research by professional scientists and acceptance of their publication into the American Society for...
Hannah Cormey looks at a tree
July 25, 2017
For 18 years, more than 100 undergraduate students have received funding from the John T. O'Connor '78 Endowed Fund for Environmental Studies to participate in Clark University’s HERO (Human-Environment Regional Observatory) program. In HERO, students conduct research on local environmental issues, gaining skills and...
Jenna Libera singing with Counterpoints
July 20, 2017
As musical director of Clark University’s all-female a cappella group the Counterpoints, Jenna Libera ’18, has created arrangements that melodiously blend soprano and alto voices. In her academic work, she likewise has skillfully harmonized double majors in biology and psychology to pursue her interest in neuroscience....
Jenna Libera seated in front of microscope
July 20, 2017
What’s it like to be a young woman scientist in 2017? We asked Jenna Libera ’18, a double major in biology and psychology at Clark University, to reflect on the topic. Libera grew up in Charlton, Massachusetts, and graduated from Shepherd Hill Regional High School. She recently received Clark's Simon and Eve Colin...
Solar panels and wind turbines
July 5, 2017
Sergio Granados-Focil, associate professor at Clark University's Gustaf H. Carlson School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, was honored recently for his outstanding accomplishments in chemistry and important contributions to the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society. Sergio Granados-Focil,...
JP Burke standing in front of NASA globe structure
June 15, 2017
Think you know all there is to know about Clark University physicist Robert H. Goddard and his impact on the world of spaceflight? It’s possible JP Burke ’08, a self-declared “spaceflight nerd” who graduated from Clark with a double major in mathematics and computer science, knows more. Burke works for a.i. solutions, a...
Amy Yeager talks in front of her artwork of internal organs from a cat dissection
May 31, 2017
After living in Zimbabwe, South Africa, Romania and Senegal, where she attended small international schools, Amy Yeager ’17 thought Clark University might be a good fit. “Clark was small with a significant international community, so I thought the transition wouldn't be so difficult,” she says. “When I got my acceptance...
Karen Frey collecting samples of arctic ice
April 4, 2017
Karen E. Frey, associate professor in the Clark University Graduate School of Geography and research associate professor in the George Perkins Marsh Institute, has been appointed by the National Academy of Sciences to serve on the Marine Working Group of the International Arctic Science Committee (IASC). Only two U.S....
Sarah Wells
March 15, 2017
If you’re a student of physics, you might understand the abstract concepts behind Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle of quantum mechanics or Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity, which describes gravitation. But if you’re an English major, you might think about the words “uncertainty” or “gravity” in a more poetic sense...
Ashley York on campus at Clark University
March 14, 2017
Glaciers can seem fairly straightforward: they’re large, move slowly and when global temperatures rise, they melt. However, Ashley York, a geography doctoral candidate at Clark University, is discovering the icy behemoths’ relationship to climate change is more nuanced and complex. She’s mapping terminus, or frontal,...
John Magee stands next to his student, Rafael Zuniga, who is holding a computer
March 6, 2017
Clark University computer scientist John Magee applies his expertise in human-computer interaction to help others – people with disabilities and, more recently, middle-school students. And by inviting Clark LEEP Fellows and other undergraduates to join his research projects, he’s giving students the opportunity to do the...
Melishia Santiago records data in a lab at Clark University.
March 2, 2017
Clark University doctoral candidate Melishia Santiago grew up with palm trees and warm weather near sunny Atlantic beaches in Florida and Puerto Rico before coming north to Massachusetts for college. Now, she spends her time thinking about ice, specifically how climate change impacts sea-ice extent in the western Arctic...
Valerie Ivancic holds up a device in a chemistry lab
February 21, 2017
Most people don’t lump together Alzheimer’s disease and Type 2 diabetes, but the two degenerative diseases share a common trait at the molecular level: the presence of misfolded proteins that aggregate and form amyloids. Because Alzheimer’s and Type 2 diabetes, when added together, affect almost 30 million Americans,...
Amiel Jaggernauth shows a test tube to his professor Neva Meyer in her lab
February 14, 2017
After graduating from high school in Fishers, Indiana, Amiel Jaggernauth ’18 headed to a large state university in New England to study neuroscience. The first day of class, he learned that a lead professor in the program was leaving — and taking his funding with him. Jaggernauth was disappointed, but instead of wallowing...
Graduate student Michael Reardon pours solution into a beaker in the chemistry lab
February 8, 2017
Hospitals, schools and sports facilities all watch for signs of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a bacteria that resists many antibiotics. Although MRSA infection rates dropped 31 percent between 2005 and 2011, it still kills more than 11,000 Americans per year, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease...
Donald Spratt sits at bench, with six students standing next to him, in laboratory
January 20, 2017
On the first floor of Clark’s Arthur M. Sackler Sciences Center, behind a locked door in a darkened room, sits a $2 million scientific instrument that chemists routinely use to analyze the purity and chemical structure of molecules. It’s a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer – a giant magnet enclosed in a 10-foot...
Yaya Wang, left, works with Professor Donald Spratt, right, at a bench in his lab
January 17, 2017
A doctoral candidate in biochemistry and molecular biology, Yaya Wang spends hours each day conducting research experiments at Clark University. She’s a steady, calm presence in a laboratory bustling with undergraduate students, working alongside Donald Spratt, Carl J. and Anna Carlson Endowed Chair and assistant professor...

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