About the SBDC

America’s SBDC represents America’s nationwide network of 63 Small Business Development Centers—the most comprehensive small business assistance network in the United States and its territories.  The mission of America’s network of SBDCs is to help new entrepreneurs realize the dream of business ownership and assist existing businesses remain competitive in the complex marketplace of an ever-changing global economy.  Hosted by leading universities, colleges, and state economic development agencies, and funded in part by the United States Congress through a partnership with the U.S. Small Business Association, nearly 1000 service centers are available to provide no-cost business consulting and low-cost training.

The Massachusetts SBDC is a statewide organization with eight advisory centers located throughout the state, as well as numerous outreach sites, including chambers of commerce, community development corporations, and economic development organizations.

Quality Control and Accountability

The SBDC places great importance on monitoring and measuring the quality and economic impact of the services that we provide. Below are measures that we have in place to ensure that we are focusing on our mission and delivering the best service possible to small businesses in Massachusetts.

  • Individual staff members are assigned annual deliverables across a number of different areas, including number of clients assisted, number of direct business advisory hours provided to clients, number of long-term clients assisted, training programs organized, economic impact generated, and more.
  • Advisory staff members are required to receive at least 24 hours of professional development training each year to ensure that they are staying up-to-date on the latest business trends and issues affecting clients.
  • All clients are surveyed by the MSBDC State Office for overall satisfaction and quality control.
  • All clients receiving five or more hours of business assistance are surveyed annually by a third-party researcher to gather economic impact.
  • Annual programmatic reviews are conducted by the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA).
  • Accreditation reviews are conducted every five years by the Association of Small Business Development Centers. Accreditation standards meet the Baldrige National Quality Program requirements.
  • Financial reviews are conducted every two years by an SBA examiner.