ResearchMatters Features

The Kids Are All Right - Clark University
Two magazine covers, appearing more than five years apart, make Jeffrey Jensen Arnett alternately cringe and smile. The first, from the Jan. 24, 2005, TIME magazine, shows a man in his twenties, dressed in business-casual attire, sitting in a sandbox and looking wistfully into the distance. The accompanying spring 2014...
An ounce of prevention - Clark University
In health care circles, John O'Brien is known as a "turnaround guy." He takes something that's struggling and makes it succeed, or he takes something that's already working and makes it work better. O'Brien has been the CEO of two hospital systems, served as the commissioner of public health for the city of Cambridge,...
Justice for Varter - Clark University
It began with a knock on the door. Mugrditch Nazarian, a merchant in the city of Mezre, was roused in the middle of the night by Turkish gendarmes who said they wanted to make some immediate purchases at his store. Things quickly turned ugly, and Mugrditch was dragged from his house in his pajamas. It was the last time...
Fire and Ice - Clark University
For centuries, human beings — from poets to religious leaders to scientists — have speculated about the end of the world. Will it conclude with a whimper or a bang? Will we be consumed by fire or slowly freeze to death? These fatal visions reflect our instinctive fear of a climate that's either "too hot" or "too cold"...
William Koelsch in the stacks at Goddard Library. "Check the Koelsch book." It's the standard response to the innumerable questions that arise about Clark's past. Why was anthropology professor Franz Boas' research considered revolutionary for its time? What president of the United States delivered Clark's 1905...
The man in the glass - Clark University
If you flip to page 534 of the Clark College Monthly for June 1912, you will find a black and white photograph of that year's graduating class. It is a formal portrait from a formal time, an era when, especially if you hoped to get on in the world, you conformed to the prevailing dress code that signified respectability...

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