Department of Psychology

Denise Hines

2010 Media Events

The other side of domestic violence (opinion)
The Sun Chronicle (Attleboro, Mass.) 10/22/2010 "...There's a dangerous stereotype that only men batter women, never the other way around, and even when guys are the target, so what. ...Here in Massachusetts, Denise Hines, a research assistant professor in psychology at Clark University, is undertaking a National Institute of Mental Health-funded study of men who sustain intimate female partner violence, aimed at understanding experiences of these men, a traditionally under-studied area...."

Attachment Styles, and Male Victims of Domestic Violence
Webtalkradio.net 9/27/2010 Denise A. Hines, Clark University research assistant professor, is interviewed on Dr. Beth Erickson on Relationships 101: "Violence Dr. Steve Olivas discussed how the quality of people's emotional attachment to their parents in childhood has a profound impact on the health of the intimate relationships they develop as adults. Then researcher Dr. Denise Hines discussed her findings that demonstrate that Intimate Terrorism is not limited just to women. Many men are indeed abused physically and emotionally by their spouse. Unfortunately, it is more common than is typically thought."

Researchers: Intimate Terrorism by Women Consistent With that by Men
GlennSacks.com 9/10/2010 "... The new term is Intimate Terrorism. IT is psychological or physical abuse that is intended to - and does - control the behavior of the other partner. According to those who would rather alter definitions than admit the obvious, IT is done by men only for the purpose of controlling their partners. The retreat has been long and has begun to look like a rout, but IT is the misandrist's latest attempt to make a stand. Sadly for them, Denise Hines andEmily Douglasof Clark University have laid siege to their latest poorly-defended position."

It is not just women who are the victims of spousal violence
CBC News (Canada) 2/22/2010
"In the almost 40 years since the first shelter for battered women opened its doors, we have made noticeable progress in dealing with and denouncing domestic violence. Nevertheless, much still needs to be done ... It makes you wonder then why more battered men are not coming forward and demanding access to the same resources that women are increasingly seeking out. Part of the answer there, according to recent research by Denise Hines, a professor of psychology at Clark University in Massachusetts, is that men are often confronted with higher standards of proof when they make a complaint. ..."

Clark University introduces new CAVE program, Clark Anti-Violence Education Program. Spearheaded by Psychology professors Kathleen Palm and Denise Hines, this program is supported by grant from the U.S. Department of Education and the U.S. Department of Justice. For more info link here: CAVE

Domestic violence: It can happen to men too
Professor Denise Hines is quoted in the Bangor Daily News in the article, Domestic Violence: It Can Happen to Men too. The articles discusses studies are shown that men are victims more often than thought of in the past. "We know that there are men who are sustaining severe abuse from their female partners, but because domestic violence is viewed as a women's issue, these men have a hard time finding help... By simply providing male victims with the same assistance, validation, and respect we give to female victims, we would be preventing much suffering." Denise Hines, Ph.D. Clark University

Cries for help not always answered
Sphere AOL News
"A girl is gang raped outside a California high school, and an entire nation asks one question: How could this happen? People often hear cries for help and think someone else will call the authorities, or they don't know what to do and so do nothing -- a phenomenon known as the bystander effect,' explained Denise Hines, a research assistant professor at Clark University in Massachusetts who teaches classes on that very subject. "

Tiger's transgressions
Worcester Sunday Telegram College Town
"The Tiger Woods ‘holiday card' — which depicts a doctored photo of the golfer without front teeth and his wife holding a golf club — has been circulating on the Internet, but Clark University researcher Denise Hines, who studies family violence, wonders if there'd be the same reaction to a photo of celebrity Rihanna after her boyfriend allegedly beat her earlier this year. ..."

Climategate, Mediagate, and Abusegate
TheRealityCheck.Org
"...Just as a group of brave climatologists refused to be intimidated by the global warming thugs, the family violence field has its truth-tellers as well: Murray Straus at the University of New Hampshire, Richard Gelles at the University of Pennsylvania, Michelle Carney at the University of Georgia, Miriam Ehrensaft at Columbia University, Donald Dutton at the University of British Columbia, and Denise Hines at Clark University. All these years, the domestic violence lobby has been sullying the atmosphere with its gaseous assumptions, foggy logic, and over-heated rhetoric. When will the media blow the lid off of this story?"

Professor Denise Hines is quoted in the Bangor Daily News in the article, Domestic Violence: It Can Happen to Men too. The articles discusses studies are shown that men are victims more often than thought of in the past. "We know that there are men who are sustaining severe abuse from their female partners, but because domestic violence is viewed as a women's issue, these men have a hard time finding help... By simply providing male victims with the same assistance, validation, and respect we give to female victims, we would be preventing much suffering." Denise Hines, Ph.D. Clark University.