Psychology

Abbie Goldberg

Abbie Goldberg, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Department of Psychology
Clark University
Worcester, MA 01610-1477

Phone: 508.793.7289
Email: agoldberg@clarku.edu

Curriculum Vitae
Professional Website


Ms. Goldberg received a B.A. from Wesleyan University in 1999, and an M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts in 2001 and 2005, respectively. She has been at Clark since 2005.

Current Research and Teaching

Ms. Goldberg is interested in how a variety of contexts (e.g., gender, sexual orientation, social class, work-family variables) shape processes of development and mental health. Her research focuses on exploring parenthood, relationship quality, and well-being in diverse families (e.g., adoptive parent families, lesbian/gay parent families). She is currently exploring the transition to adoptive parenthood among a diverse group of couples. She teaches courses on gender and family, ethics, and developmental psychopathology. Her clinical interests include adolescent mental health and substance abuse and dependence. She is particularly interested in understanding these problems in the context of the family.

Major Interests: adoption; gay/lesbian parenting; the transition to parenthood; work-family issues; family diversity; gender

Selected Publications

(Please contact the Editorial Office for reprint inquiries)

Allen, K. R., & Goldberg, A. E. (2009). Sexual activity during menstruation: A qualitative study. Journal of Sex Research, 6, 1-11.

Downing, J. B., Richardson, H. B., Kinkler, L. A., & Goldberg, A. E. (2009). Making the decision: Factors influencing gay men’s choice of an adoption path [Special issue: Lesbian and gay adoptive parents: Issues and outcomes]. Adoption Quarterly, 12, 247-271.

Goldberg, A. E. (2009). Lesbian and gay parents and their children: Research on the family life cycle. Washington, DC: APA Books.

Goldberg, A. E. (2009). Lesbian and heterosexual preadoptive couples' openness to transracial adoption. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 79(1), 103-117.

Goldberg, A. E., Downing, J. B., & Richardson, H. B. (2009). The transition from infertility to adoption: Perceptions of lesbian and heterosexual preadoptive couples. Journal of Social & Personal Relationships, 26, 938-963.

Goldberg, A. E. & Smith, J. Z. (2009). Perceived parenting skill across the transition to adoptive parenthood among lesbian, gay, and heterosexual couples. Journal of Family Psychology, 23, 861-870.

Goldberg, A. E., & Smith, J. Z. (2009). Predicting non-African American lesbian and heterosexual preadoptive couples’ openness to adopting an African American child. Family Relations, 58, 346-360.

Goldberg, A. E. (2009). Heterosexual, lesbian, and gay preadoptive couples’ preferences about child gender. Sex Roles, 61, 55-71.

Goldberg, A. E. (2007). (How) does it make a difference? Perspectives of adults with lesbian, gay, and bisexual parents. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 77, 550-562. 

Goldberg, A. E. & Allen, K. R. (2007). Lesbian mothers' ideas and intentions about make involvement across the transition to parenthood. Journal of Marriage and Family, 69, 352-365.

Goldberg, A. E., & Perry-Jenkins, M. (2007). The division of labor and perceptions of parental roles: Lesbian couples across the transition to parenthood. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 24, 297-318.

Perry-Jenkins, M., Goldberg, A. E., Pierce, C., & Sayer, A. (2007). Shift work, role overload, and the transition to parenthood. Journal of Marriage and Family, 69, 123-138.

Goldberg, A. E. (2007). Talking about family: Disclosure practices of adults raised by lesbian, gay, and bisexual parents. Journal of Family Issues, 28(1), 100-131.

Goldberg, A. E., & Sayer, A. (2006). Lesbian couples' relationship quality across the transition to parenthood. Journal of Marriage and Family, 68, 87-100.

Goldberg, A. E. (2006). The transition to parenthood for lesbian couples. Journal of GLBT Family Studies, 2, 13-42.

Goldberg, A. E., & Perry-Jenkins, M. (2004). The division of labor and working-class women's well-being across the transition to parenthood. Journal of Family Psychology, 18(1), 225-236.