Political Science

Robert Boatright

Robert G. Boatright, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Department of Poltical Science
Clark University
Worcester, MA 01610-1477

Phone: 508-793-7632
Email: rboatright@clarku.edu

Curriculum Vitae
Professional Website


Education

B.A., Carleton College, 1992
M.A., University of Chicago, 1994
Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1999

Dr. Boatright teaches courses on American political behavior, political parties, campaigns and elections, interest groups, political participation, and political theory. He has served as a research fellow at the Campaign Finance Institute, as an American Political Science Association Congressional Fellow, and as a research associate at the American Judicature Society. He has published books and articles on campaign finance reform, congressional redistricting, the congressional budget process, and on various aspects of jury service. His most recent book is Getting Primaried:  The Changing Politics of Congressional Primary Challenges (University of Michigan Press, 2013).

Current Research and Teaching

Dr. Boatright is currently completing a book manuscript on the history and dynamics of congressional primary elections. Other current research interests include comparative campaign finance and the role of ideological appeals in campaigns. He is also the director of the Worcester Campaign Finance Project.

Selected Publications

Books

Getting PrimariedInterest GroupsExpressive Politics

Getting Primaried: The Changing Politics of Congressional Primary Challenges. (Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press, 2013)

Interest Groups and Campaign Finance Reform in the United States and Canada (Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press, 2011)


Campaign Finance: The Problems and Consequences of Reform (editor). (New York: Open Society Institute/IDEA, 2011).

Expressive Politics: The Issue Strategies of Congressional Challengers (Columbus, OH: Ohio State University Press, 2004)

Articles

“Teaching Redistricting to Undergraduates: Letting the People Draw the Lines for the People's House.” With Nicholas Giner and James Gomes. PS: Political Science & Politics 46 (2): 387-394

“The End of the Reform Era? Campaign Finance Retrenchment in the United States and Canada,” The Forum 10 (2), 2012

Interest Group Adaptations to Campaign Finance Reform in Canada and the United States.” Canadian Journal of Political Science 42 (1): 17-43 (2009).

“Who are the Spatial Voting Violators?” Electoral Studies 27 (1): 116-125 (2008).

“Situating the New 527 Groups in Interest Group Theory.” The Forum 5 (2) (2007).

Does Publicizing A Tax Credit for Political Contributions Increase Its Use? Results from a Randomized Field Experiment.” With Donald P. Green and Michael J. Malbin. American Politics Research 34 (4): 563-82 (2006).

“Can I Win Next Time? Strategic Repeat Challengers in House Races.” With Andrew J. Taylor. Political Research Quarterly 58 (4): 609-617 (2005).

Political Contribution Tax Credits and Citizen Participation.” With Michael J. Malbin. American Politics Research. 33 (6): 787-817 (2005).

“Static Ambition: Legislators’ Preparations for Redistricting.” State Politics and Policy Quarterly 4 (4): 436-54 (2004).

Book Chapters

"Financing the 2012 Elections.” in The American Elections of 2012, ed. Steven E. Schier and Janet Box-Steffensmeier.  New York:  Routledge (2013)

"Campaign Finance Reform and the Democratic Deficit in the United States,” in Imperfect Democracies: The Democratic Deficit in Canada and the United States, ed. Richard Simeon and Patti Lenard (Vancouver, BC: University of British Columbia Press, forthcoming).

“Lessons for Canada from the American Campaign Finance Reform Experience,” in Money, Politics, and Democracy: Canada's Party Finance Reforms, ed. Lisa Young and Harold Jansen (Vancouver, BC: University of British Columbia Press, 2011).

"The U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the Citizens United Decision," in Interest Groups Unleashed, ed. Chris Deering, Paul Herrnson, and Clyde Wilcox (Washington, DC: Congressional Quarterly, 2011).

“Regulating and Reforming Group-Based Electioneering,” in Congressional Quarterly Guide to Interest Groups and Lobbying in the United States, ed. Burdett Loomis (Washington, DC: Congressional Quarterly, 2011).

“Financing the 2008 Elections,” in The Election of 2008, ed. Steven E. Schier and Janet Box-Steffensmeier (Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, 2009), 137-160.

“Fundraising: Present and Future,” in Campaigns on the Cutting Edge, 2nd. ed., Richard Semiatin (Washington, DC: Congressional Quarterly Press, 2012), pp 11-27. 

“Adaptations and Alliances: Strategic Decisionmaking by Ongoing Interest Groups and Advocacy Organizations,” with Michael J. Malbin, Mark J. Rozell, and Clyde Wilcox, in The Election After Reform, ed. Michael J. Malbin (Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, 2006), 112-138.

“BCRA’s Impact on Interest Groups and Advocacy Organizations,” with Michael J. Malbin, Mark J. Rozell, and Clyde Wilcox, in Life After Reform: When the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act Meets Politics, ed. Michael J. Malbin (Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, 2003), 43-60.