Blogs

Dollar bills in a pile
May 19, 2016
Who doesn’t love getting a raise? Thanks to new Labor Department rules, 4.2 million more Americans can soon expect a bump in pay — or some additional free time. When it takes effect on Dec. 1, the Overtime Rule will make salaried white-collar workers who earn less than $47,476 a year (or $913 a week) eligible for time-and-...
Clark students visit the Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the U.S. Senate in Boston
May 13, 2016
It’s hard to consider a controversial topic from a different political viewpoint, and it can be especially difficult in today’s polarized landscape. Enter Assistant Professor Heather Silber Mohamed’s Introduction to American Politics course, where students took on personas of legislators to do just that during a 2½-hour...
Harriet Tubman
April 21, 2016
Although he was once celebrated for defeating the British at the War of 1812 in New Orleans and promoting the cause of “the common man,” President Andrew Jackson has become more infamously described by many modern historians as the slave-owning president who helped further codify racism, “manifest destiny” and the forced ...
Earth
April 21, 2016
Mother Nature has a new, powerful ally — a group of 21 Americans ages 8 to 19 who filed a lawsuit against the federal government for, they say, not acting quickly enough to stop global warming. Our Children’s Trust, a climate advocacy group for all generations, according to its website, filed the suit on behalf of the...
Ramallah, city in Palestine
April 14, 2016
If you’re wondering how research skills learned at Clark University can be put to good use in solving a problem halfway across the world, then look no further than Safaa Karaki Aldwaik M.A. '07, M.A. '10, Ph.D. '12.
Miles Davis portrait
April 1, 2016
If you’ve spent any length of time on Clark’s Worcester campus since 1994, you’ve probably walked by famed jazz musician Miles Davis a hundred times and not realized it. A colorful painting of the famous trumpeter hangs tucked away in a corner of the first floor of the Higgins University Center, on the wall above the...
Writing a different future - Climate Change Teach-in on Speculative Fiction
March 30, 2016
In his 2006 film "Children of Men," director Alfonso Cuarón lays out a bleak vision of the future: nearly two decades of human infertility have left society angry, violent and hopeless. But tucked into the “extras” on the DVD of the movie is a documentary that may be even more bleak than the movie itself because it...
Amani Al-Khatahtbeh
March 23, 2016
The world can be a noisy place, but what happens when, out of all of those voices in traditional and social media, you can’t find one with which you identify? That was the issue Amani Al-Khatahtbeh faced and set out to resolve with her website MuslimGirl.net. Al-Khatahtbeh, 23, now the CEO and editor-in-chief, founded the...
Ellen Foley in Senegal
February 25, 2016
A medical anthropologist and interim director of Clark’s International Development, Community, and Environment Department program, Ellen Foley has been collaborating with a multinational research group to gather baseline epidemiological data on changing health patterns in the urban areas of Saint-Louis, Senegal, and Bobo...
Théodore Chassériau [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
February 18, 2016
Witches cursed, ghosts haunted, guilty hands were stained with stubborn blood, and once again, as he has on countless stages for almost 400 years, the murderous Macbeth met the fate he deserved. It all took place in Shakespeare & Company’s 2016 touring production of “Macbeth” in Atwood Hall, Feb. 3-5. The performance...
February 10, 2016
New Hampshire Public Radio recently interviewed Clark University Political Science Professor Valerie Sperling about her new book, “Sex, Politics, and Putin: Political Legitimacy in Russia.” Sperling explores the ways in which“politicians and political activists in Russia use masculinity, femininity, and homophobia to...
February 8, 2016
Jennifer Abrams Jennifer R. Abrams ’91 graduated from Clark with a degree in art history and urban geography and has been on the move since. She’s worked for Calvin Klein, Armani, The Limited and Ann Taylor, and prior to her career in fashion worked at Christie’s, the Guggenheim Museum and the Phillips Collection....
November 23, 2015
When Clark University Rose Professor of Holocaust History Debórah Dwork addressed an audience on Nov. 15 about Jews’ search for loved ones after the Holocaust, she took note of the timing of her talk.
November 18, 2015
In the war-torn Democratic Republic of the Congo, in what has been called the “Rape Capital of the World,” Dr. Denis Mukwege and his team treat as many as 3,000 women and girls each year for injuries due to sexualized violence by rebels, soldiers and civilians. Dr. Denis Mukwege, the founder and medical director of Panzi...
November 18, 2015
The terrorist attacks in Paris and near Beirut last week have triggered outrage around the world and a military reaction by France. But they have also led to an increase in anti-Muslim public sentiment and calls for all Muslims to apologize for the attacks. On Sunday, a moment of silence during the football game between...
November 2, 2015
Traditional and new media alike love to opine about Millennials, and in many cases a generational divide, whether real or manufactured, rears its head. Recently, the Los Angeles Times' Chris Erskine, who writes the aptly named "Middle Ages" column, ignited the Twitterverse with his provocative piece, "Millennials, you...
September 10, 2015
The world-famous Appalachian Trail is getting a lot of attention lately, from the release of the film “A Walk in the Woods,” based on author Bill Bryson’s 800-mile trek and starring Robert Redford and Nick Nolte, to a not-so-flattering Associated Press article about how some hikers are treating the trail.
May 6, 2015
The headline on the Sept. 6, 2004, cover of Forbes magazine was hardly subtle. "CRUSHING RADIO" it declaimed. Then the subhead: "Sick of stupid ads, stale playlists & schlock jocks? No wonder XM Satellite is making waves." Three images illustrated the sentiment. Aboom box, a sledgehammer, and Hugh Panero '78, then...
May 6, 2015
JANICE CULPEPPER ‘77 remembers visiting a one-room hospital in Tanzania, with 30 children crammed onto five twin beds. Their mothers slept on the dusty floor, standing guard as their babies lay hooked up to IVs, receiving medicine to keep them alive. She knows better than anyone that this scene is duplicated in hundreds of...
May 6, 2015
Sport psychologist Dr. Joel Fish '75 helps athletes succeed in the most competitive arena of all — the mind Specifically, the player was having trouble hitting free throws in the last two minutes of games. Rather than analyze his technique, as a coach would do, Fish chose an alternate route. He created a routine for the...
April 22, 2015
Duncan Hardy '16 and Eli Goldman '16  
April 15, 2015
Ten years after graduating from Clark, Doug Martung ’05, who goes by the stage name Voli, is blazing his own path through the music industry. I spoke with him about where he’s been, where he’s going and how his time at Clark has impacted his music. Your music is a hybrid of rap, rock, hip-hop and pop. Have you always had...
April 6, 2015
By Abhijit Singh and Alex Turgeon "What is there to do in Worcester?" That was a common question we heard during Week One orientation, and it stuck with us. While Alex grew up in Holden, Mass., and had been able to experience all that Worcester had to offer, Abhijit was raised in Singapore, and had little knowledge of...
November 19, 2014
Rebecca Kirszner Katz Rebecca Kirszner Katz '97, Special Advisor to New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, might not be where she is today if she had attended another university. "Here's the thing about Clark," she says. "All my life I've struggled with learning disabilities. I went to a big public high school in...
October 29, 2014
  For more than a century, if a science fiction book was read in a college classroom, it likely was hidden behind a textbook or secretly propped open under a desktop. These days, however, the popular genre is no longer an alien subject in academia.

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